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Ha-Ste Manufacturing Providing Quality

Wet Mops And Dust Mops Since 1959

 



Ha-Ste Marketing Manager Dale Stewart



By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

Located in the heartland of America, Ha-Ste Manufacturing, of Union City, IN, is a leading manufacturer of industrial wet and dust mops, specializing in custom made products. The company is proud that its more than 4,000 product offerings are “made in America.” Founded in 1959, the company has been operating out of its current location, which covers a city block in Union City, since the early 1960s.

 

“Over the years, we have modernized our facility and added warehouses, while maintaining the historic integrity of our older buildings,” said Ha-Ste Marketing Manager Dale Stewart, during a recent interview with Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine. “Since 1959, we have slowly added employees and expanded operations here in Union City, as we have gained new accounts and built relationships with customers.

 

“We provide full lines of dust mops, wet mops, microfiber products and hardware, including handles and frames. We also offer custom manufacturing, making more than 4,000 products in many color combinations. In addition, we offer private and bar code labeling — whatever a customer wants.

 

Controller Teresa Tillman works on
accounts receiveable.

 

“We service several market segments, including janitorial supply, foodservice and laundry accounts. We have also supplied some specialized products for uses in agriculture. In addition, Ha-Ste participates in some co-manufacturing with other companies.”

 

Dale Stewart, who is the nephew of Ha-Ste President Robin Stewart, described business at Ha-Ste as “good.”


“We are actually up about 3 percent from last year,” Stewart said. “We are hoping this continues. We are looking at increasing our marketing efforts. I recently graduated from Butler University with a degree in marketing. We are going to put a renewed emphasis on marketing as well as continuing to focus on meeting customers’ needs.”


Like many other companies, Ha-Ste concentrated on having a leaner, more efficient operation coming out of the recession years of 2008-2009, with a renewed commitment to develop new products and aggressively market them. One of the company’s goals during the recession was to keep its employees working. While some hours were cut, the company was able to keep its staff basically intact during the worst of the downturn.

 

Another way Ha-Ste is able to keep production costs down is by taking advantage of automation.


“We have tried to cut back on hands-on work,” Stewart said. “We have made the effort to automate and modernize our factory. We are really trying to do more with fewer people. Our employees do a great job of taking on several different jobs to provide a quality product.”


Having a loyal, established customer base also helped Ha-Ste weather the worst of the economic downturn.

 

“We have had some really good customers. They have stuck with us and supported us, and we, in turn, have been there for them. As a result, we made it through the recession pretty well,” Stewart said.

 

While Ha-Ste is experiencing growth coming out of the recession, raw material prices remain a concern.


“Cotton prices have been really going through the roof,” Stewart said. “We had to deal with high prices earlier this year. In talking with the yarn mills, they are not sure where prices are going. There are shortages and China bought a lot of the cotton crop, which really affected prices.”

 

A Special ‘Extra Ingredient’

 

Ha-Ste calls it the “special extra ingredient” that it puts in all of its products. It is “the sincere heartfelt winning attitude of all our employees.”

 

One business strategy for many companies that came out of the recession and continues is maintaining as little inventory as possible as a cost-cutting measure. One of Ha-Ste’s specialties is quick turnaround times on orders, which is accomplished by the hard work and dedication of the company’s 24 employees.

 

“Our employees process orders really quickly,” Stewart said. “We are able to get truck orders out in three or four days. Smaller shipments are sent, usually the same day or the next day. Our staff does a great job.”

 

Along with quick turnaround times, Ha-Ste’s top-notch reputation is also due to the quality of products the company has consistently offered over the years.


“We call the personal pride employees take in manufacturing quality products, in conjunction with

a genuine caring attitude toward customers, the 'Ha-Ste Extra,'" Stewart said.

 

Sharie Puderbaugh, of the dust mop department,
is shown centering a dust mop.

 

“Our work force does a great job as far as quality is concerned, especially with our custom manufacturing, as there are many variations involved. If there are any issues, employees bring it to our attention," Stewart said. “Our customer service backing up our quality products really makes the difference. If it is a custom product, we will work with customers to manufacture that product to their specs, and then support them after the sale. Any issues that arise, we are here to help.

 

“I think our customers appreciate that we can manufacture a ‘made in the USA’ custom product to their specs, colors, etc. We also offer quick turnaround times on orders that other, larger companies that may import from overseas just can’t match.

 

“Our customer service, quality ‘made in the USA’ products and the ability to ship orders quickly are what sets us apart from the competition. We are proud to put our name on our products.”


(Continued on Top Right Column)

Like many companies, Ha-Ste enjoys a loyal and predominately veteran staff. As some long-time employees are facing retirement down the road, the company has embarked on a strategy to establish a balance of experience and youth.

 

As a recent graduate from Butler University, Stewart is leading the way in complementing Ha-Ste’s veteran and highly experienced staff with younger employees. The goal is to take the company into the future with a blend of experience and new energy and ideas.

 

“We have some fresh faces around the factory,” Stewart said. “We have some younger guys who are really stepping up. We are pretty excited. The combination of youth and experience will bode well for us in the future.”

 

The Mop Industry Was ‘Green’

Before There Was ‘Green’

 

Long before environmentally friendly products and practices moved into the mainstream of the nation’s business world, the mop industry made products using recycled yarns, cotton, post-consumer polyester bottle flakes, etc.

 

Today, Ha-Ste is aggressively marketing its new and existing lines of environmentally friendly products.

 

Gloria Bailey works in the wet mop department sewing a

headband using a Ha-Ste built automated sewing machine.


“We offer the EarthKleen wet mop and dust mop that are made with 100 percent recycled fiber from plastic bottles,” Stewart said. “We brought the EarthKleen products in a couple of years ago and they are really good items for our green line. We have also just recently launched the UnderDog wet mop that is made of 100 percent post-industrial waste. We are looking at the UnderDog as our new mop to combat cost issues with cotton.”

 

According to Ha-Ste, the EarthKleen Supreme Loop wet mop is made with new environmentally friendly GreenTex yarn, 100 percent certified recycled fibers of pure green PET plastic bottles and post-consumer rayon/polyester. The mop’s construction is designed to virtually eliminate fraying, untwisting and excessive linting, saving up to 50 percent on time and labor costs. The product’s heavy-duty, multiple-stitched fanband prevents tangles, extends mop life and improves performance and launderability. This line also includes a dust mop.

 

Ha-Ste claims its UnderDog wet mop costs less and out performs cotton, while holding up on concrete and textured floors. The UnderDog is designed to absorb 70 percent more liquid than cotton and releases 30 percent more liquid than cotton. The mop is a rayon-synthetic blend made from 100 percent repurposed post-industrial waste.

 

Other environmentally friendly products offered by Ha-Ste include, the GreenLoop Microfiber Blend Dust Mop made with a 50 percent microfiber synthetic blended, looped-end yarn for more effective dry mopping. These durable, high quality dust mops work well in health care and other eco-conscious environments.

 

Ha-Ste’s commitment to the environment goes beyond offering green products. Internally, Ha-Ste is also involved in environmentally friendly practices.


“As far as our factory goes, we have redone the lighting to save electricity. We also recycle our cardboard and plastic on a daily basis," Stewart said. "In addition, we donate a lot of our test yarn samples and mops to local entities such as the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and other places around town. We try to avoid throwing

a lot of stuff away. If somebody can

use it for something, we will try

to help them out.”

 

 

Production Manager Taylor Koon operates a double fan,

looped-end mop winder built by Ha-Ste's Fred Huddle.


Ha-Ste offers many more lines of mops made with cotton, rayon blends and synthetic blends, including:

• Looped-end wet mops: Ha-Ste says its looped-end wet mop line includes products for all situations, from high intensive laundering to general purpose use. The MicroKleen line alone is available in 114 different combinations of style, color and banding;

• Mop Master Closed-End wet mops: According to Ha-Ste, the Mop Master Closed-End wet mop yarn is the “step-up” mop from the traditional cut-end wet mop. Closed-ends offer some of the benefits of looped-ends without the cost. Ends will not fray and will retain liquid better than cut-ends. Available in both cotton blend and synthetic blend yarns;

• Cut-End Wet Mops: Known as the workhorse of the maintenance trade, cut-end wet mops include many types of cotton, rayon, and synthetic blends designed for general purpose mopping activities such as spill cleanup, floor stripping and applying liquids; and

• Finish Wet Mops: Ha-Ste’s finish mop line includes non-linting nylon mops, traditional rayon blended candy-striped yarns in a flat mop style.

 

In addition to the GreenLoop Microfiber Blend Dust Mop, other dust mop lines are offered in several categories, including highly launderable, synthetic, general purpose, economy and disposable.

 

Other microfiber products include scrubbing/cleaning mop pads, dusting mop pads, scrubbing strip wet mop pads and towels. Microfiber hardware items include aluminum, locking collar and threaded end holders, as well as aluminum extension handles.

 

Looking Ahead

 

Despite the struggling economy, Stewart is optimistic about Ha-Ste’s future as the company aggressively continues to expand its marketing efforts. He is also enthusiastic about the infusion of younger employees into the company, working in conjunction with more experienced veteran staff members.

 

“Maintaining the great relationships we have with our customers will remain top priority as we move forward,” Stewart said. “We are a family business and we try to treat our customers like family. Any problems that they have, we take care of them.

 

“Our customers have stuck by us, worked with us, given us feedback and we can work with them. When it comes to our work force, many of them have been here 20-plus years, making custom products with many variations. We have thousands of product combinations and our employees do their best to get a good quality product out quickly. They just do an amazing job. We are very, very lucky.”

 

Contact: Ha-Ste Manufacturing, Inc., 119 East Elm St.,
P.O. Box 168, Union City, IN 47390-0168.
Phone: 800-228-6677; Fax: 937-968-4524.
E-mail: service@hastemops.com.
Web site: www.hastemops.com.

 



 

Import, Export Figures Increase In Several Categories

 

import

Including complete list of May 2011

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first five months of 2011 indicate raw material imports were up in two of the four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first five months of 2010. For May 2011, raw material imports were up in three of the four categories outlined, compared to May 2010.

 

Import totals for the first five months of 2011 were down in four of the six finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2010. In May 2011, three of the six categories outlined recorded increases, compared to May 2010.

 

RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 34,809 kilograms of hog bristle in May 2011, up 61 percent from 21,574 kilograms imported in May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 171,353 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, a 146 percent increase from 69,748 kilograms imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

China sent 171,272 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first five months of 2011.

 

The average price per kilogram for May 2011 was $16.43, down 14 percent from the average price per kilogram for May 2010 of $19.06. The average price per kilogram for the first five months of 2011 was $9.84, down 29 percent from the average price per kilogram of $13.79 for the first five months of 2010.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during May 2011 was 2.4 million, up 33 percent from 1.8 million for May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 9.3 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 26 percent from 7.4 million for the first five months of 2010.

 

During the first five months of 2011, the United States received 4.1 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 2.1 million from Honduras and 1.9 million from China.

 

The average price per handle for May 2011 was 87 cents, up 21 percent from the average price for May 2010 of 72 cents. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 80 cents, up 14 percent from 70 cents for the first five months of 2010.

 

Brush Backs

May 2011 imports of brush backs totaled 524,072, down 48 percent from the May 2010 total of 1 million brush backs.

 

During the first five months of 2011, 2.3 million brush backs were imported, down 34 percent from 3.5 million for the first five months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 1.3 million brush backs to the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Canada shipped 952,130.

 

The average price per brush back was 46 cents during May 2011, up 12 percent from the average price for May 2010 of 41 cents. For the first five months of 2011, the average price per brush back was 50 cents, up 6 percent from the average price for the first five months of 2010 of 47 cents.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during May 2011 was 4.2 million, up 24 percent from 3.4 million for May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 14.4 million metal handles were imported, down 3 percent from 14.8 million for the first five months of 2010.

 

During the first five months of 2011, Italy shipped 6.5 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 4.4 million and Spain shipped 3 million.

 

The average price per handle for May 2011 was 60 cents, up 30 percent from 46 cents for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 70 cents, up 43 percent from 49 cents for the first five months of 2010.

 

FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS


Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At Less Than 96 Cents

Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during May 2011 totaled 31,944, up 70 percent from 18,780 brooms imported during May 2010.

 

During the first five months of 2011, 53,880 brooms of broom corn were imported, up 13 percent from 47,520 imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom in May 2011 was 82 cents, up 6 percent from 77 cents for May 2010. The average price per broom for the first five months of 2011 was 84 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for the first five months of 2010.

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 819,033 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during May 2011, down 9 percent from 903,283 for May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 3.6 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 8 percent from 3.9 million imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

Mexico shipped 3.5 million brooms to the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Honduras sent the remainder.

 

The average price per broom for May 2011 was $2.39, down 1 cent from the average price for May 2010. The average price per broom for the first five months of 2011 was $2.44, down 2 cents from the average price for the first five months of 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during May 2011 was 98,096, down 63 percent from 264,022 brooms and brushes imported during May 2010.

 

During the first five months of 2011, 639,790 brooms and brushes were imported, down 47 percent from 1.2 million imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka exported 441,834 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Vietnam sent 89,380.

 

The average price per unit for May 2011 was $1.18, down 2 cents from the average price for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was $1.20, an decrease of 18 percent from the average price recorded for the first five months of 2010 of $1.47.



Toothbrushes

The United States imported 83 million toothbrushes in May 2011, up 2 percent from 81.2 million imported in May 2010.

 

During the first five months of 2011, 371.5 million toothbrushes were imported, an increase of 4 percent from 358.1 million imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

China sent 249.3 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first five months of 2011. Meanwhile, Switzerland shipped 36 million, Vietnam sent 25.9 million and India exported 21.1 million.

 

The average price per toothbrush for May 2011 was 20 cents, the same as for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 22 cents, up 2 cents from the average price for the first five months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 9.3 million shaving brushes in May 2011, down 18 percent from 11.3 million imported in May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 45.4 million shaving brushes were imported, down slightly from 45.6 million imported during the first five months of 2010.

 

China sent 17 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Mexico sent 12.1 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for May 2011 was 10 cents, the same as for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 12 cents, the same as for the first five months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 21.3 million paintbrushes during May 2011, up 7 percent from 20 million paintbrushes imported during May 2010. Paintbrush imports for the first five months of 2011 were 92.5 million, down 9 percent from 101.6 million recorded for the first five months of 2010.

 

China shipped 72.8 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Indonesia exported 17.5 million.

 

The average price per paintbrush for May 2011 was 29 cents, down 9 percent from 32 cents for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 31 cents, up 19 percent from the average price of 26 cents for the first five months of 2010.

 

EXPORTS

Export totals for the first five months of 2011 were up in two of the four categories outlined, compared to the first five months of 2010. In May 2011, three of the four categories outlined reported increases in exports, compared to May 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 8,123 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during May 2011, up 7 percent from the May 2010 total of 7,605 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first five months of 2011 were 37,616 dozen, down 7 percent from 46,021 dozen for the first five months of 2010.

 

The United States shipped 15,428 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first five months of 2011.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $37.26 in May 2011, down 18 percent from $40.15 for May 2010. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first five months of 2011 was $55.44, an increase of 66 percent from the average price per dozen for the first five months of 2010 of $33.30.

 

Toothbrushes

During May 2011, the United States exported 7.5 million toothbrushes, down 20 percent from the total recorded in May 2010 of 9.4 million. During the first five months of 2011, 41.2 million toothbrushes were exported, down 6 percent from 43.6 million exported during the first five months of 2010.

 

The United States exported 15.6 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first five months of 2011, while sending 7.7 million toothbrushes to Mexico.

 

The average price per toothbrush for May 2011 was 70 cents, down 4 percent from the average price for May 2010 of 73 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first five months of 2011 was 59 cents, down 20 percent from 74 cents for the first five months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 1.1 million shaving brushes during May 2011, up 17 percent from 942,430 shaving brushes exported for May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 9.5 million shaving brushes were exported, up 58 percent from 6 million during the first five months of 2010.

 

Mexico imported 3.7 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Canada imported 1.8 million.


The average price per shaving brush for May 2011 was $1.01, down 7 percent from $1.09 for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was 61 cents, down 46 percent from $1.13 recorded for the first five months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during May 2011 was 248,453, up 46 percent from 169,674 paintbrush exports recorded for May 2010. During the first five months of 2011, 971,803 paintbrushes were exported, up 21 percent from 802,267 during the first five months of 2010.

 

Canada imported 684,377 paintbrushes from the United States during the first five months of 2011, while Mexico received 40,297.

 

The average price per paintbrush for May 2011 was $8.71, down 18 percent from $10.59 for May 2010. The average price for the first five months of 2011 was $9.84, down 19 percent from $12.13 recorded for the first five months of 2010.

 

Click here for entire May 2011 Export/Import Statistics

 

 

deal

 

U.S. Imports 19 Short Tons Of

Broom Corn In June

 

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

 

 

A total of 19 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States during June 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Total value of this import was $48,356, with a cost per ton of $2,545 ($1.27 per pound). All imported broom corn for June came from Mexico.

 

After the first six months of 2011, 326 short tons of broom corn had been imported into the United States. Total value of this import was $680,381, with a cost per ton of $2,087 ($1.04 per pound). In comparison, a total of 461 short tons of broom corn entered the United States after the first six months of 2010. Total value of this broom corn was $1,284,945, with a cost per ton of $2,787 ($1.39 per pound).

 

All but 9 short tons of broom corn during the first half of 2011 were imported from Mexico. The remaining broom corn arrived from Chile in February.

 

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, said that although low, June’s broom corn import total of 19 short tons may be correct. He added that broom corn processed from the year’s first Torreon harvest in Mexico is usually not available until the following month of July.

 

Bart Pelton

 

“We (at PelRay International) did bring in some broom corn in June, but it wasn’t over 19 tons. Therefore, I can’t disprove that number,” Pelton said. “There are a few buyers every year who like to hold off importing broom corn until the new crop arrives from Torreon. Prices are often better.”

 

When interviewed on August 29, he added that broom corn from this year’s first Torreon harvest has been available since July and that the harvest was on the small side. There has also been a considerable amount of Mexican carry-over broom corn available this summer, which was grown in 2010.

 

“The fact that there has been plenty of carry-over is one reason why Mexican broom corn prices haven’t gone up a whole lot in spite of a fairly small crop from Torreon,” Pelton said. “(This year’s first Torreon crop) was smaller than last year, and probably one of the smallest crops experienced in a number of years.”

 

Pelton, however, did not have any problem with the quality of the broom corn he has seen thus far from Torreon this year.

 

“The quality has been just fine. Like typical Torreon broom corn, it’s fairly long and there is a lot of hurl, which is good. With so many grass brooms being made, it’s important to have more hurl available than insides. Of the carry-over material available from last year, the bulk of this broom corn has been insides,” he said.


 

When asked about yucca fiber used in the production of some natural brooms, Pelton said he has seen some stability take place pertaining to lead times and pricing.

 

Regarding overall business at his company, he added that sales in July and August rebounded nicely from a slower period experienced in June.

 

Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, noted that at 2011’s current pace, the 1,000 short ton broom corn import mark will not be reached in the United States by the end of the year.

 

Tim Monahan


He added that 19 short tons of imported broom corn is a very low figure for June, but July’s figure could very well be higher to reflect Torreon’s first harvest of the year.

 

Monahan also felt this harvest was smaller compared to previous years. There remains questions, however, with broom corn usage in Mexico.

 

“I know our demand is down (in the United States), but I don’t know what Mexican demand and usage are right now,” Monahan said. “It’s hard to crosscheck our estimates just because we don’t get down there (to Mexico) as much due to the country’s security issues.”

 

Monahan did estimate that broom corn imported into the United States for the second half of 2011 could be as high as 500 short tons. However, a more likely figure would be in the 300 to 400 range.

 

On the positive side, there are good expectations about the quality of this year’s broom corn from the first Torreon harvest.

 

“I have heard it’s good material. It’s typically the best quality broom corn we see every year,” Monahan said.

 

Concerning yucca fiber, he stated on August 29 that pricing has gone up while delivery times have lengthen a bit. This is mainly due to several processors who have shut down their operations.

 

Monahan also commented on the state of overall business as of the latter part of August.

 

“Business has been up and down. Overall, it seems to be getting a little bit better as we go through the year. There are moments, however, when you wonder if the bottom just fell out again.”

 

Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, was unavailable for comment during this month’s broom corn dealer survey.

 

 

 

asasas

 



Zahoransky’s Z.LYNX3 Provides Fully-Automated
Production Of Nylon And Wire Brushes

Zahoransky AG, of Todtnau, Germany, now offers the Z.LYNX3. The fully-automated machine is designed to produce twisted-in-nylon and wire brushes with an end capped on one side or eyelets. According to Zahoransky, it offers a high degree of automation at consistently high quality and performance levels.

 

Zahoransky says the Z.LYNX3 guarantees a consistently high product quality of twisted brushes. Due to its flexibility, eyelet diameters of between 6-40 millimeters can be manufactured. Non-rounded eyelets can also be produced. The full servo control offers operators a maximum of process stability including screw-in monitoring, wire feeding, wire straightening, wire shaping and wire cutting.


The CNC-controlled cutter device with HSS trimmer provides for an automatized finish. The electronically secured protective housing of the Z.LYNX3 offers operators safety.

The Z.LYNX3 produces twisted-in-nylon and
wire brushes.

 

The Z.LYNX3 is equipped with a screw-in machine that boasts an automatic feed of the handle wire. Coming from a wire coil, the wire is advanced at respective length via the servo drive, cut, and bent by the servo-controlled bending plate and the bending roll. The screw-in gripper removes the bent wire from the bending plate. A strip of material is pushed between the bent wire and turned between the screw-in rolls.

A CNC-controlled trimming device with HSS trimmer cuts the brushes during the screw-in process, and thus provides for a highly precise contour cut. The trimming device then cuts the brushes at the desired length. Ejection of the ready brushes takes place via a conveyor belt.

 

Zahoransky's new Z.LYNX3.

 

 

The Z.LYNX3 provides for the manufacture of wire tufting or nylon filaments via a spool or a material preparation unit for material lengths between 30 and 130 millimeters. The ZMI3 touchscreen control enhances operating smoothness and provides for a clearly arranged production data acquisition and recipe management.

 

Costs per unit of brushes manufactured with the Z.LYNX3 are comparable to costs of manually operated or semi-automated systems.

 

For more information, call Zahoransky USA at 630-466-1901 or visit www.zahoransky-group.com.



Briarwood Products Introduces Microfiber Surface Cleaning Tools

 

Briarwood Products Company, a manufacturer of connectors and accessory items for the sanitary supply industry, has introduced 18- and 24-inch microfiber surface cleaning tools designed for any surface cleaning application.



The microfiber cleaning tools, according to the company, are durable, easy to clean and can fit any standard threaded handle. With a 360-degree swivel radius, these tools are able to slide under furniture and equipment, and are also able to fit into tight corners.

 

In order to keep the mop pads secure, the microfiber cleaning tools feature a strong molded plastic base and two Velcro® strips. The base allows for the mop to set flat on the floor, which helps prevent streaking. Shorter 7-, 9-, 11-, and 13-inch long sizes are also available.

 

Visit www.briarwoodproducts.com for more information.

 

 

 



How Many Brushes Do You Have?

ABMA Survey Concludes The Average Home Contains 38 Brushes

 

The American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) recent survey results show the average home to contain 38.05 brushes.

 

ABMA Executive Director David Parr stated: “Brushes are typically the type of item that fly under the radar screen for most people. I think we greatly underestimated how much contact we have with brushes every day.”


 

ABMA President Ian Moss added: “One would be amazed to think how our lives would be different were we to live in a world without brushes. No Rembrandt, no Van Gogh, your hair and teeth would look a fright, and I don’t even want to think about the bathroom.”

 

The bathroom led the way with an average of over 7 brushes, followed by the garage, workshop, recreation storage areas and the kitchen — all with between 4-5 brushes each. The average automobile has 3 brushes, and it looks like you can be fairly certain if you open a purse you will find at least 1 brush.

 

ABMA undertook the survey as a way to answer a question long debated by members of the association. Parr remembers his father telling him many years ago the average household had 20 brushes, and this came up in conversation during a planning session for the association’s upcoming 100th anniversary.

The results indicate that in the time from then until now, brushes have become even more prevalent in the average household, which is a good thing for the broom, brush, roller and mop industry.

 

“There is an important industry here manufacturing brushes and as a supplier to this industry, it’s gratifying to see the strong number and variety of brush products in the home. Brushes do not get much public attention; however, they play an important role in our lives,” Dan Sinykin, of Monterey Mills, said.
Monterey Mills is a manufacturer of paint roller cover knit pile fabric and Sinykin is ABMA Suppliers Division chair.

 

Brushes have been around for as long as man has been using tools. Brushes are used for cleaning, grooming, painting, surface finishing and for many other purposes. They can be tiny and they can be immense; come in all shapes and sizes and with an amazing assortment of bristles, filaments, pads, covers; and can be found just about everywhere in industrial, commercial, residential and personal use.

 

Send an email to info@abma.org or visit www.abma.org

for more information.

 

 

 



Padco Appoints New National Accounts Manager

 

Padco Inc., of Minneapolis, MN, has appointed Rollie Peterson as the company’s new national accounts manager. Peterson brings over 25 years of experience in the hardware/consumer products industry.

 

He has a range of knowledge from brand development and packaging to sales management at Homax. He also is the founder of Tile Care Products of the Twin Cities.

 

Peterson says, “I am excited to join the Padco team and I look forward to building on its long history of innovation. Padco prides itself as the originator of the paint pad. It also prides itself on offering the only ‘All-Made In USA’ products. I look forward to the challenges, and opportunities, that increasing demand for quality ‘Made In USA’ products brings to this category.”

 

Peterson is a native Minnesotan. He was raised in Minnetonka, MN, and attended the University of Minnesota where he studied business. He currently resides in Plymouth, MN, with his wife, Lisa, and family.

 



Rollie Peterson

 

For more information, contact John Mackey at (612) 378-7270 or send an e-mail to jmackey@padco.com.

 

 



Nexstep Commercial Products
Purchases Assets Of Hamburg Industries

 

Nexstep Commercial Products (exclusive licensee of O-Cedar) headquartered in Springfield, OH, has announced that it has purchased the assets of Hamburg Industries, Inc., in Hamburg, PA. Hamburg has manufactured cleaning products (brooms, brushes and mops) since 1894 and sells to distributors across the United States.

 

Nexstep Commercial Products will relocate Hamburg’s manufacturing and distribution facilities to its Paxton, IL, and Springfield, OH, plants. Hamburg’s line of products will be added to Nexstep Commercial Products’ line of products for the commercial and foodservice markets. Richard Stiller, president of Hamburg Industries, will become part of the Nexstep team to ensure that the acquisition is seamless for all of Hamburg’s customers.

This is Nexstep Commercial Products fifth major acquisition since the company’s inception in August of 2003. Todd Leventhal, president of Nexstep Commercial Products, said, “The acquisition of Hamburg Industries is a tremendous opportunity for our company, as it provides our customers with a wider range of products, and it provides Hamburg’s customers with the many advantages of the O-Cedar Commercial branded line.”

 

Visit www.ocedarcommercial.com for more information.

 


 

 

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