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Company Officers Ben Waksman & Albert Waksman.



By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor


Poised to celebrate 50 years in business in the fall, Corona Brushes Inc., of Tampa, FL, has built a reputation in the brush industry as a company that stresses integrity, quality, innovation, attention to detail and the best in customer service.

 

Corona specializes in the manufacture of high-quality handmade painting tools distributed throughout the United States and Canada, as well as internationally.

 

“We operate in a 65,000 square-foot manufacturing facility,” said Corona President Benjamin Waksman, during a recent interview with Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine. “While the largest portion of our business focuses on paintbrushes and paint rollers designed for professional users, we also offer a broad selection of industrial and marine paint applicators, in addition to paint applicators for the DIY (do-it-yourself) customer.”

 

Benjamin Waksman runs the company with his brother, Albert Waksman, who is the vice president.

 

The bulk of Corona’s business is with independent paint stores and some paint manufacturers that operate their own stores. While the company does not sell directly to the professional end-user, its relationship with the professional marketplace has been a crucial element in the company’s success.


Customer Service Director Tammy Epperson reviews Corona catalog with Susan Waksman, wife of Albert.

 

“We have earned the loyalty of painters through the years, which has been a key in maintaining growth and has been a very beneficial relationship,” Albert Waksman said. “While we don’t sell directly to painters, we have professionals we rely on to test new product designs.

 

“We conduct thorough testing in the field before we add a product to our program. We don’t offer a product to our dealers that hasn’t been thoroughly proven.”

 

The company’s motto is: “Corona — It’s what paint needs.” Corona’s lineup of professional brushes includes the Corona Performance Chinex® Series, a top-of-the-line application tool for today’s high-tech coatings. According to the company, this line of brushes is designed, formulated and constructed with 100 percent DuPont™ Chinex® tapered synthetic filament to maximize the benefits of superior paint release and cleanup.

 

The Performance Chinex® brushes are touted to be effective with acrylics, heavy-bodied waterbornes, alkyd-modified latex coatings and primers, as well as all paints. The brushes’ deep flagg tips are made in-house by Corona to resemble natural China bristles for a smooth paint finishing.

 

Also in the company’s professional paintbrush lineup is the Corona Red-Gold™ Nylon/Polyester Blend series. Red-Gold paintbrushes combine the best elements of solid round tapered DuPont™ Tynex® Nylon and Orel® Polyester filaments for interior and exterior painting. These brushes are designed to provide superior paint application in oil and latex paints for both inside and outside in all four seasons.

 

The company’s Corona Champagne Nylon™ line of paintbrushes are made with a softer synthetic filament, making them ideal for applying interior latex, enamels, eggshell and flat paints.

 

Other professional paintbrush series the company offers include Gold Nylon, Black Nylon, Black China Bristle, White China Bristle, China Bristle & Ox-Ear Hair and Badger-Style Bristle.

 

Designed for institutional and commercial painters, Corona’s MightyPro™ paintbrushes and rollers are designed to provide performance and exceptional value. In addition, Corona’s roller sleeves are made using high quality materials including natural, woven and knit fabrics. The company makes roller sleeves for all types of coatings. Corona’s trim roller assemblies are manufactured with various materials and naps for residential, industrial, maintenance and marine applications.

 

“Last year, we introduced a new line of roller sleeves called UltraFast™, which is doing well,” Benjamin Waksman said.

 

UltraFast roller sleeves are made with the company’s uniquely formulated high density polyamide material, featuring fine feathered tips that act like natural bristles to provide improved paint pickup and superior release. The polyamide fabric used in this line of paint roller sleeves comes from Italy.

 

“Unfortunately, we can’t get the polyamide fabric we use in the United States, or else we would have dealt with a U.S. provider,” Benjamin Waksman said. “This line of paint roller sleeves is doing well and is growing.”

 

This year, Corona introduced a couple of new stain brushes to the marketplace, which Benjamin Waksman reported are also doing well. When it comes to introducing new products, Benjamin Waksman said the company prefers a conservative approach to marketing.

 

“We don’t like ‘flashy’ marketing moves,” he said. “We do advertise and we work with our dealers, but sometimes it takes a few years for a product to get established in the market. We prefer that slow, steady growth. Sometimes products that are introduced to the marketplace with a ‘flash’ approach also disappear in a flash.”

 

Corona’s conservative approach to introducing new products, as well as changes and reformulations of its offerings, has helped the company in gaining a loyal following among professionals, who lean toward sticking with “tried and true” products.

 

“We work with suppliers to ensure that the quality starts with the raw materials,” Benjamin Waksman said. “We inspect every shipment, whether it is handles, nails, filaments, bristles, etc., to ensure we are receiving high quality materials. Secondly, we are very careful to ensure our formulas are consistent. We test formulas. We conduct batch testing to make sure that the roller or paintbrush we make today is going to be equal to the one we made yesterday.

 

“If there is an improvement to be made, a reformulation or a new idea to be used in the process, we will communicate this to our customers and sales force. Painters, once they get used to something, don’t like you to change it. If they are using a certain filament or a certain handle shape, color or style, and it is changed, especially without notice, it is not well accepted.”

 

Synthetic Filaments Popular

In The United States

One of the challenges Corona faces on the raw material front is obtaining natural China bristle. As synthetic filaments have grown to dominate the U.S. market, companies are looking overseas to obtain natural bristles, as natural bristles are still popular in Europe and in China. Benjamin Waksman explained that many paintbrushes are now manufactured in China and the Chinese are seemingly more interested in exporting complete brushes, rather than the raw material. Raw material prices have also continued to rise.

 

Albert Waksman added: “The synthetic brush business has grown substantially. Our DuPont Chinex filament is very popular and there is still a large demand for DuPont nylon and polyester filaments.”

 

The dominance of synthetic filaments in the U.S. market is due to the popularity of modern water-based paints. Synthetic paintbrushes work best with water-based paints that are thicker than traditional oil-based paints, typically applied with natural bristle brushes.

 

Before Corona made paintbrushes, it was in the bristle processing business. With this expertise in bristle processing, the company continues to use unique processes to make bristles work better and last longer.

 

“Less usage of oil-based products has meant fewer sales of natural bristle products,” Benjamin Waksman said. “At the same time, because oil-based paints have been reformulated, it is more difficult to get a smooth finish. As a result, we are seeing more sales of our bristle/ox ear hair blends than ever before, because using these blends will result in a smoother finish.

 

“Even though the demand for hog bristle is dropping, we maintain a full bristle mixing department. We conduct our own in-house processing and boiling to ensure quality control. With the synthetics, we do our own processing also, including mixing, blending, tipping, flagging, etc.

 

“There has been a tremendous growth in the sale of synthetics, for all types of uses. This is the trend that we will see more and more — an increase in synthetics and fewer natural bristles.

 

“We have not, as of yet, started working with chemically tipped filaments, as have some U.S. producers. Many imported brushes are arriving with chemically tipped filaments, which are basically straight filaments with the tips honed fine with acids. We still prefer the DuPont solid round tapered material, which we think offers the best painting qualities, as well as durability, to the user.”

 

In addition to paintbrushes and paint roller products, Corona offers an assortment of metal and plastic trays, plastic tray liners and quality grids for five-gallon paint pails. The company also sells extension poles and accessories for use with Corona Paint Roller Systems.

Perseverance And Hard Work

Bring ‘The American Dream’ Into Fruition

Corona’s founder, Jude H. Waksman, learned the trade of processing hog bristles for paintbrush manufacturing in his homeland of Russia. When the Bolsheviks seized power following World War I, he left Russia seeking a better life for his family. His desire was to come to America; however, immigration quotas at that time prohibited him from settling in the United States. As a result, he settled in Havana, Cuba.

 

Jude Waksman found work as a laborer in Cuba and sent for his wife and daughter. After the family reunited in Cuba, two boys and another daughter were born.


(Continued on Top Right Column)

During World War II, a door opened for Jude Waksman to apply his skills in processing hog bristles for paintbrush manufacturing. The supply of Chinese and Russian bristle to U.S. paintbrush manufacturers was disrupted because of the war. Jude Waksman seized the opportunity and built a processing facility outside Havana to supply the United States with bristle from Cuban hogs. Jude Waksman’s bristle operation went on to evolve into a paintbrush and paint roller manufacturing company, and, with the help of his sons, Gregory and David, the company grew into a major supplier of brushes and rollers in the Caribbean.

 

“At first, the company’s formal name was National Brush Company of Cuba,” Benjamin Waksman explained. “The brand name they picked was ‘Good Luck,’ with a horseshoe logo on the handles. It was the ‘Good Luck’ line in English, because in the mid-1940s, in pre-Castro Cuba, anything that smacked of the United States was considered the best. This is why the American phrase ‘Good Luck’ was selected.”

 

It wasn’t long, however, until it became evident that Cuban painters were having a hard time pronouncing “Good Luck.” Company officials went back to the drawing board and came up with the name “Corona” — the Spanish word for “crown.”

 

The company was doing well, but in 1959, political events would intervene, which would result in the family immigrating to Jude Waksman’s original destination — America. In 1959, Fidel Castro came to power in Cuba ushering in a repressive communist regime. The Waksman family fled to Miami, FL.

 

“It was a small family group who left Cuba, fleeing the political situation there,” Benjamin Waksman said. “The family was able to immigrate to the United States and get a foothold. After deciding not to stay in Miami, the family moved to Tampa and started another paintbrush factory (in the fall of 1961). It was a humble beginning for sure. During the first years, the big question was whether or not the business was going to survive.

 

“By that time, my grandfather was an older man and not in the best of health. It was basically his two sons, David and Gregory, who took it upon themselves to create the business. Eventually they gained a following among local dealers and painters for Corona products and, a few years later, began marketing outside of Florida.”

 

Both Jude and David Waksman have been deceased for several years, and Gregory Waksman, Benjamin and Albert Waksman’s father, died last year.

 

“Unfortunately, the three of them (Jude, Gregory and David) are not around to see this day. It would have been a nice thing to have all of them here to be able to participate in the operation of the company,” Benjamin Waksman said. “When our father passed, Albert and I decided we would share the title of president on a rotating basis. It is my turn, and in another year or so, it will pass to Albert. At that time, I will hold the title of vice president.

 

“The company started in Tampa in the fall of 1961, but it took a few months to really get going. Therefore, the anniversary will start in the fall of 2011, and we will continue to mark the event for the following 12 months. We plan to introduce some new products and conduct an advertising campaign that will highlight the anniversary. We are planning some events for our sales force and our dealers.

 

“The celebration is an important one, but, at the same time, it will be a little muted, as we are still feeling the loss of our father.”

 

Quality Customer Service Goes

Hand-In-Hand With Quality Products

Throughout the 1990s and into the mid-2000s, Corona brush continued to prosper, recording record sales in 2007 — then the recession hit.

 

“The total economy basically changed, and 2008 and 2009 were years of challenges,” Benjamin Waksman said. “The housing market was down and people were painting less.”

 

While the economy has struggled to bounce back from the recession years, Corona’s business has picked up nicely.

 

“Through word of mouth, the demand for Corona products is growing and has kept us pretty busy,” Benjamin Waksman said. “We advertise to support our marketing, but nothing takes the place of that sincere word-of-mouth endorsement. It is just about the best marketing tool available.”

 

Much of Corona’s stellar reputation stems from its focus on attention to detail, quality workmanship and personalized customer service.


Brushmaking Supervisor Tania Abreu works
with Company President Ben Waksman in
developing a new handmade paintbrush.

 

“We are a family company, and the ownership is very close to the ‘trenches,’” Benjamin Waksman said. “Sometimes employees, customers, and even painters, will call as late as 7 p.m., and they are many times surprised when they are able to speak to one of the owners, as we are often working late.

 

“We believe in personalized service. We don’t take anything for granted. My dad had a saying, ‘You earn your business with every order — with every brush.’ Every time you ship a brush you are trying to earn somebody’s loyalty and business. The quality has to be there in the product as well as in the service. It is not just the speed that you ship that is important, but also how easy is it for the customer to break down a shipment, understand the paperwork, etc.

 

“If there is a problem, we just don’t tell the customer to call the freight company. We contact the freight company ourselves, and we do the utmost to solve problems for our customers. I think these are things that differentiate Corona from other companies in the brush business, as well businesses in other fields. When a customer calls Corona, the phone will be answered by a human being who is going to take care of the caller.”

 

The company’s nearly 100 dedicated and highly trained employees, including some who have been with Corona for more than 30 years, have made it possible to sustain the manufacture of high quality products and a high level of customer service. Most of the products Corona makes are essentially handmade, which requires a skillful work force.

 

“Without good people we would not have been able to produce the type of products that we manufacture,” Benjamin Waksman said. “In order to maintain the quality, consistency and care we try to put into our products, it takes the full focus of our employees. They are skillful in every facet of manufacturing, whether it is the preparation of the materials, the hand shaping of the brushes to build a fine chisel edge, the assembly, the epoxy setting or the final finish. Everything is important and everything has to be carefully done.

 

“The same is true with our paint roller production, and with our customer service department. We like to pay attention to every little detail. To me, there is no such thing as an unimportant detail. Everything is important, whether it is how a brush is built, how an order is shipped or how the phone is answered.”

 

Quality, Long-lasting Products

Help Preserve The Environment

When it comes to being environmentally friendly, Corona’s philosophy is that the best way to protect the environment is to make a quality product that can be used for a long time.

 

“Even when using recycled materials, it takes energy to build something,” Benjamin Waksman said. “When products are made using recycled materials that may not last as long as top-of-the-line materials, then I don’t think this is helping the environment. I think the best and most sincere way to protect the environment is to have as little waste as possible in manufacturing.

 

“Waste cannot be totally avoided. There are going to be materials that are placed in landfills. Therefore, we believe the best thing is to have a product that lasts a long time, rather than a brush that will last a few weeks. We make brushes that will last several months to several years for painters who take care of their tools.”

 

Moving On To Future ‘Good Old Days’

During tough economic times such as the United States has experienced the past few years, it is not uncommon to think wistfully and nostalgically about the “good old days.”

 

“There have always been challenges. Any period of time that we might look back upon as ‘the good old days’ always had challenges of some kind,” Benjamin Waksman said. “There was always something going on to keep a person’s mind occupied on how to resolve a particular issue. The main issues we face today are a slow economy that doesn’t seem to be on track for growth.

 

“Furthermore, we are fooling ourselves if we think the economic issues we have are going to be quickly resolved, when so much of our manufacturing has left our shores. We are not going to resolve our unemployment issues quickly, when so many of our products that we use are coming from overseas.”

 

While new challenges are sure to arise down the road, Benjamin and Albert Waksman are both optimistic about the future of Corona Brushes.

 

“Despite today’s economic realities, people still have to paint, whether they do it themselves or hire a painter,” Benjamin Waksman said. “There is a truth that when you paint, your biggest cost is the labor; therefore, it is better to use a good quality paint and a good quality brush or roller — this is the only way to go.

 

“We owe our company’s success to the opportunity the United States offers to people who are willing to work hard. We also owe our success to the paint dealers and painters who had faith in Corona in the early days.

 

“We also owe thanks to Jude, Gregory and David Waksman. Without their vision and leadership, Corona would not have been founded and would not have persevered to become the successful company it is today.

 

Albert Waksman added: “Our priority at Corona is to continue to do what we do best and not lose sight of the things that got us to where we are, and hopefully we will be around for another 50 years.”

 

Contact: Corona Brushes, Inc., 5065 Savarese Circle, Tampa, FL 33634. Phone: 800-458-3483;

Fax: 813-882-9810.
Email: info@coronabrushes.com.
Website: www.coronabrushes.com.

 



 

First Quarter Raw Material Imports Show Mixed Results

 

import

Including complete list of March 2011

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first quarter of 2011 indicate raw material imports were up in two of the four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first quarter of 2010. For March 2011, raw material imports were down in two of the four categories outlined, while one category reported an increase and one category remained the same, compared to March 2010.

 

Import totals for the first quarter of 2011 were down in five of the six finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2010. In March 2011, all six categories outlined recorded decreases, compared to March 2010.

 

RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 11,766 kilograms of hog bristle in March 2011, up 79 percent from 6,587 kilograms imported in March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 86,364 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, a 236 percent increase from 25,674 kilograms imported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

China sent 86,283 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first quarter of 2011.

 

The average price per kilogram for March 2011 was $18.20, up 165 percent from the average price per kilogram for March 2010 of $6.86. The average price per kilogram for the first quarter of 2011 was $10.56, down 43 percent from the average price per kilogram of $18.66 for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during March 2011 was 1.5 million, the same as during March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 5 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 16 percent from 4.3 million for the first quarter of 2010.

 

During the first quarter of 2011, the United States received 1.9 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 1.3 million from Honduras and 1.1 million from China.

 

The average price per handle for March 2011 was 72 cents, up 2 cents from the average price for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 77 cents, up 12 percent from 69 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Brush Backs

March 2011 imports of brush backs totaled 651,671, down 4 percent from the March 2010 total of 680,030 brush backs. During the first quarter of 2011, 1.3 million brush backs were imported, down 28 percent from 1.8 million for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 789,755 brush backs to the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Canada shipped 533,479.

 

The average price per brush back was 53 cents during March 2011, the same as March 2010. For the first quarter of 2011, the average price per brush back was 52 cents, up 6 percent from the average price for the first quarter of 2010 of 49 cents.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during March 2011 was 2.8 million, down 10 percent from 3.1 million for March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 8.1 million metal handles were imported, down 7 percent from 8.7 million for the first quarter of 2010.

 

During the first quarter of 2011, Italy shipped 4.3 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 1.9 million and Spain shipped 1.6 million.

 

The average price per handle for March 2011 was 62 cents, up 32 percent from 47 cents for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 72 cents, up 47 percent from 49 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued

At Less Than 96 Cents

Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during March 2011 totaled 8,796, down 54 percent from 19,176 brooms imported during March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 11,376 brooms of broom corn were imported, down 41 percent from 19,176 imported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom in March 2011 was 84 cents, down 10 percent from 93 cents for March 2010. The average price per broom for the first quarter of 2011 was 83 cents, down 11 percent from 93 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued

At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 848,359 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during March 2011, down slightly from 852,604 for March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 2 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 13 percent from 2.3 million imported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

Mexico shipped all 2 million brooms to the United States during the first quarter of 2011.

 

The average price per broom for March 2011 was $2.55, up 2 percent from $2.50 for March 2010. The average price per broom for the first quarter of 2011 was $2.48, down 1 cent from the average price for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during March 2011 was 85,248, down 69 percent from 276,855 brooms and brushes imported during March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 396,774 brooms and brushes were imported, down 45 percent from 718,167 imported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka exported 275,585 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Vietnam sent 60,920.

 

The average price per unit for March 2011 was $1.12, down 36 percent from $1.74 for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was $1.27, an decrease of 13 percent from the average price recorded for the first quarter of 2010 of $1.46.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 62.3 million toothbrushes in March 2011, down 21 percent from 78.4 million imported in March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 218.8 million toothbrushes were imported, an increase of 8 percent from 202.4 million imported during the first quarter of 2010.


China sent 146.8 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Switzerland shipped 22.7 million.

 

The average price per toothbrush for March 2011 was 24 cents, up 20 percent from 20 cents for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 21 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Paint Rollers

The United States imported 3.9 million paint rollers in March 2011, down 22 percent from 5 million imported in March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 13.8 million paint rollers were imported, a decrease of 5 percent from 14.6 million imported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

China sent 9.7 million paint rollers to the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Mexico sent 3.2 million.

 

The average price per paint roller for March 2011 was 46 cents, up 20 percent from 37 cents for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 43 cents, up 8 percent from 40 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 11.6 million paintbrushes during March 2011, down 46 percent from 21.3 million paintbrushes imported during March 2010. Paintbrush imports for the first quarter of 2011 were 48.6 million, down 12 percent from 55.3 million recorded for the first quarter of 2010.

 

China shipped 37.5 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Indonesia exported 10.2 million.

 

The average price per paintbrush for March 2011 was 38 cents, up 36 percent from 28 cents for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 33 cents, up 22 percent from the average price of 27 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

EXPORTS

 

Export totals for the first quarter of 2011 were up in two of the four categories outlined, compared to the first quarter of 2010. In March 2011, two of the four categories outlined also reported increases in exports, compared to March 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 5,968 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during March 2011, down 44 percent from the March 2010 total of 10,624 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the quarter of 2011 were 21,254 dozen, down 26 percent from 28,708 dozen for the first quarter of 2010.

 

The United States shipped 8,059 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first quarter of 2011, while The United Kingdom imported 4,770 dozen and Ireland received 1,567 dozen.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $34.41 in March 2011, up 42 percent from $24.18 for March 2010. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first quarter of 2011was $67.27, an increase of 125 percent from the average price per dozen for the first quarter of 2010 of $29.95.

 

Toothbrushes

During March 2011, the United States exported 7.3 million toothbrushes, down 24 percent from the total recorded in March 2010 of 9.6 million. During the first quarter of 2011, 24.9 million toothbrushes were exported, down 5 percent from 26.2 million exported during the first quarter of 2010.

 

The United States exported 8.7 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first quarter of 2011, while sending 6 million toothbrushes to Mexico.

 

The average price per toothbrush for March 2011 was 64 cents, down 16 percent from the average price for March 2010 of 76 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first quarter of 2011 was 56 cents, down 23 percent from 73 cents for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 4.3 million shaving brushes during March 2011, up 207 percent from 1.4 million shaving brushes exported for March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 7.2 million shaving brushes were exported, up 125 percent from 3.2 million during the first quarter of 2010.

 

Mexico imported 3.6 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first quarter of 2011, while Canada received 1 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for March 2011 was 36 cents, down 69 percent from $1.17 for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was 48 cents, down 59 percent from $1.17 recorded for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during March 2011 was 259,525, up 20 percent from 216,950 paintbrush exports recorded for March 2010. During the first quarter of 2011, 555,211 paintbrushes were exported, up 18 percent from 470,641 during the first quarter of 2010.

 

Canada imported 369,230 paintbrushes from the United States during the first quarter of 2011.

 

The average price per paintbrush for March 2011 was $11.19, up 2 percent from $10.96 for March 2010. The average price for the first quarter of 2011 was $10.50, down 18 percent from $12.87 recorded for the first quarter of 2010.

 

Click here for March 2011 Export/Import Statistics

 

deal

 

U.S. Imports 80 Short Tons

Of Broom Corn In April

 

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

 

 

The U.S. Department of Commerce reported that 80 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States during April 2011. Total value of this import was $183,825, with a cost per ton of $2,298 ($1.15 per pound). All imported broom corn for April came from Mexico.

 

After the first four months of 2011, 227 short tons of broom corn had been imported into the United States. Total value of this import was $464,613, with a cost per ton of $2,047 ($1.02 per pound). All but 9 short tons of broom corn through April were imported from Mexico. The remaining broom corn came from Chile in February.

Richard Caddy

 

Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, felt April’s broom corn import figures reported by the government were more accurate compared to the past several months.

 

 

 


When interviewed on July 8, he added that current Mexican broom corn pricing has remained steady for the past month. This trend my change, however, when Mexico’s first Torreon broom corn crop of 2011 becomes available to U.S. buyers later this summer.

 

“During some years a drop in pricing took place once the new Torreon broom corn became available to the market. Pricing has also gone the other direction in the past as well. It’s hard to say what will happen this summer,” Caddy said.

 

As of the first part of July, Caddy reported he was still receiving Mexican broom corn that was grown in 2010. He said this broom corn has remained in good condition concerning quality.

 

“Sometimes it takes a little longer to accumulate the shorter hurl, but we have been able to receive a reasonable amount of No. 1 broom corn and supplement this with No. 2,” he said. “Even the No. 2 merchandise tends to be pretty nice material. There can be an issue with color, but the fiber is still good.”

 

When asked about yucca fiber, Caddy added that pricing has remained steady over the past 60 days. Lead times, meanwhile, have been at 2 to 4 weeks.

 

Caddy also reported that the level of overall business at his company has been fairly high, even during a time of year when vacations among customers are quite normal.

 

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX; and Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, were both unavailable for comment for this month’s broom corn dealer survey.

asasas

 



Borghi, Techno Plastic, Unimac And
Bellucci Break Ground For New Building

 

Borghi s.p.a., manufacturers of brush, broom and mop manufacturing equipment located in Castelfranco Emilia, Italy, has broken ground on an expansion that will create a new headquarters for their partners.

 

These partners are: Techno Plastic s.r.l., manufacturers of machinery for the production of brush and broom monofilaments and strapping bands; Unimac s.r.l., manufacturers of power brush manufacturing machinery, metal handle manufacturing machinery and automation equipment; and Bellucci s.r.l., builders of custom industrial electrical cabinets, a longtime supplier to Borghi and now a partner.

 

The expansion will cover 5,600 square meters (approximately 62,000 square feet), creating a new headquarters for Unimac, Techno Plastic and Bellucci. It will be adjacent to Borghi’s headquarters, creating better synergy between the companies and making it more convenient for visiting customers. Construction is scheduled to be completed in the first quarter of 2012 with all the companies in the new location at that time.

 

Visit www.borghi.com.

 

Ground Breaking

Pictured, left to right, are Vanes Villani, president of Unimac s.r.l.; Davide Ori, president of Techno Plastic s.r.l.; Enzo Ferrari, president of Borghi s.p.a.; and Massimo Bellucci, president of Bellucci s.r.l.


 


Zahoransky’s Z.SAILFIN Provides Efficient
Production Of Interdental And Mascara Brushes

 

Zahoransky AG, from Todtnau, Germany, has presented its new machine for manufacturing twisted interdental and mascara brushes. According to the company, Z.SAILFIN combines cost-effectiveness with quality and large batch sizes.


Ground Breaking

Zahoransky's Z.SAILFIN

 

Z.SAILFIN merges the advantages of the DM series with new components. Its real output of 60 brushes per minute is about a fifth higher than that of the DM series’ other machines — with no additional costs. Technical availability is up to 98.5 percent.

The system also includes 3 additional servo axes. Now, a total of 10 servo axes provide for a quick conversion with minimal assembly effort, and precise positioning boosts brush quality. Important parameters such as wire advance, wire straightening, wire spreading, screw-in numbers, screw-in direction and brush diameters can be adjusted via a 5.7-inch touch screen and administered according to models in the recipe management.

 

Producing more brushes in a shorter period has become an industry requirement. Zahoransky says due to a minimum of change-over parts and retooling via technically-controlled parameter sets, change-over time with a complete sample change has been reduced by more than half. It provides for an even filament distribution via a vibrator feeder.

 

A fully centric trimming result can be guaranteed by way of integrated trimming in the screw-in device. Due to high variability, even extremely thin wire and brush diameters can be achieved. This provides for tightest bend radiuses to access even the smallest embrasures.

 

Zahoransky officials say operating the system is easy: Two to three machines can be operated by a single person. In combination with the camera system KO 32, the assembly machine M6D/M6M and the trimming machine MCT/DCT, Z.SAILFIN boasts an attractive manufacturing concept for efficient production.

 

Production features for the Z.SAILFIN include: Finished brush lengths — up to 80 mm; Wire diameter — 0.18 to 1.0 mm; Brush diameter — 1.7 to 11.0 mm; Tufting width — 8 to 32 mm; and, Performance — up to 60 brushes per minute depending on length, wire, diameter and width.

 

Visit www.zahoransky-group.com.

 

 

 

 

 


 


Pferd Introduces SG-Plus Whisper Line Of Grinding Wheels

With Reduction In Noise And Vibration

 

According to the company, Pferd’s new Whisper SG-Plus reinforced grinding wheels increase user comfort levels and productivity results. This combination of maximum performance features can result in a substantial savings in labor costs, while greatly improving working conditions.

 

Made with a patented design that produces soft, quiet grinding with lower vibration and dust levels, Whisper wheels work well for high volume grinding where high quality surface finishes are required.

 

According to Pferd, Whisper wheels can replace any conventional grinding wheel for increased productivity. This productivity innovation is designed to work on angle grinders in all output categories for surface grinding of weld seams and fillet welds. The SGP Whisper is available with aluminum oxide grain for grinding steel and stainless steel, and the SGP Whisper ALU version is available for grinding aluminum.

 

These depressed center wheels (Type 27), in 4 1/2 and 5-inch diameter sizes, feature both unthreaded 7/8-inch arbor hole and threaded 5/8 - 11 styles. Their noise reduction level has been measured at 90 percent as compared to conventional grinding wheels, and vibration reductions have also been charted with similar improvements in limit values.

Pferd SG-Plus Whisper Grinding Wheel

 

For additional information call 1-800-342-9015 or visit www.pferdusa.com.

 

Pferd Inc., and Pferd Canada Inc., are North American subsidiaries of August Rüggeberg GmbH & Co., of Marienheide, Germany, a 212-year-old company that designs and manufactures abrasive products, cutting tools, brushes and power tools. Advance Brush is a subsidiary of Pferd Inc.

 


 

 

BBM Calendar of Events

 

September 29 - October 1, 2011
53rd FEIBP Congress, Vienna, Austria
Information: www.eurobrush.com


October 18 - 21, 2011
ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Las Vegas, NV
Information: 800-225-4772

 

November 2011 Date/Location TBA
National Broom & Mop Meeting

Co-chairs Joel Hastings and Andrew Dailey


March 7 - 10, 2012

ABMA Annual Convention, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Information: 720-392-ABMA (2262)


March 10 - 13, 2012
International Home & Housewares Show,
Chicago, IL, Information: 847-292-4200


May 1 - 3, 2012

National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV
Information: 203-840-5622


May 9 - 11, 2012
ISSA/INTERCLEAN® - Amsterdam (NL)
Information: 847-982-0800


May 9 - 11, 2012
InterBrush, Freiburg, Germany
Information: www.inter-brush.com