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One of the six following candidates will be presented with the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award during the Closing Business Session of the American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) 95th Annual Convention. The convention is scheduled for March 7-10 at the PGA National Resort & Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. The award ceremony will take place at 9:20 a.m. on Saturday, March 10.

 

The William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award — which recognizes innovation of manufactured products, components or services in the broom, brush, mop and roller industry — is named after the first ABMA president who served from 1917 to 1928. This award serves as a reminder that new and exciting endeavors have beginnings that connect with real people.

 

The following products will also be on display during this year’s convention. The 2012 candidates are:

 

Linzer Products Corporation’s Everlok™

Extension Poles

 

The Linzer Products’ Everlok ultra-lightweight group of extension poles have been developed using especially strong anodized aluminum. The Everlok poles have non-slip, non-stick surfaces that prevent paint build up, double grooves for variable positive locking, and a quick lock/quick release system.

 

The poles also come with soft foam grips and strong threaded aluminum tips that fit most paint roller frames. The Everlok pole system is designed for both professional and do-it-yourself painters.

 


 

Zahoransky’s Z.LYNX3

 

The Zahoransky Z.LYNX3 fully-automated machine is designed to produce twisted-in-nylon and wire brushes with an end capped on one side or eyelets. According to Zahoransky, the Z.LYNX3 is the first and only fully automated machine to produce twisted-in-wire brushes with a loop handle. Therefore, one operator can run up to three units.

 

Additionally, the machine is flexible in terms of brush type, length, diameter and processed material. In a short time, the operator can switch over from loop handle brushes to closed-end, or from nylon to wire bristles. Different samples are stored in a program and can run via an HMI control system.

 

Due to the flexibility of the Z.LYNX3, eyelet diameters of between 6-40 millimeters can be manufactured. Non-rounded eyelets can also be produced. The full servo control offers operators a maximum of process stability including screw-in monitoring, wire feeding, wire straightening, wire shaping and wire cutting.

 

The CNC-controlled cutter device with HSS trimmer provides for an automatized finish. Also, the electronically secured protective housing of the Z.LYNX3 offers additional safety for operators.

 


Purdy’s 2x Faster Wire Brushes

 

According to Purdy, these wire brushes remove paint two-times faster due to their crisscross bristle pattern. The stainless steel bristles are rust resistant, and a removable scraper is included for tight areas.

 

The wire brushes, with a patent-pending design, have multiple grip positions in place for less fatigue; and come with an ergonomic, comfort grip handle.

 

 

Shur-Line Deck Stain Pad With

Groove Tool

 

This two-in-one tool from Shur-Line stains flat surfaces and between boards at the same time. Its pad design helps prevent ripping due to screws, nails or rough wood. The product is designed to prevent dripping, pooling and streaking for even coverage and accuracy.

 

A pivoting feature allows users to simply flip the handle to engage the groove tool. The product attaches to an extension pole for a comfortable staining position. The threaded handle can be used with most standard extension poles. This Shur-Line item is part of a complete stain system including dispenser.

 

 

A. Richard Tools’ Fat Boy Roller Covers

 

The Fat Boy Roller Covers from A. Richard Tools Company fits any standard size frame. The product includes a 2-inch outside diameter roller cover. Microfiber used for the roller covers allows for exceptional paint pick up and release, according to the company.

 


(Continued on Top Right Column)

A. Richard Tools’ Gooseneck

Flexible Paintbrush

 

The Gooseneck Flexible Paintbrush from A. Richard Tools Company helps prevent back problems and ladder accidents, according to the company. Users can apply paint to hard-to-reach areas.

 

The product is good for trimming high ceilings, high walls and baseboards. A main function of the product is to allow painters to trim at a higher level than a conventional brush. Polyester-nylon filaments are used for a smooth finish.

 

 

 

ABMA Annual Convention Full Of Events

 

The 95th ABMA Annual Convention is billed as four days of networking, fellowship and information sharing. The theme of this year’s convention is “Social Networking Your Brand,” and will include the Suppliers Display, the Finished Goods Static Display, divisional meetings, guest speakers, receptions and other key events. (A complete schedule accompanies this article.)

 

Wednesday, March 7, is the first full day of activities for the convention this year. The Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting is scheduled from 8 to 9:20 a.m., followed by the Public Relations Committee Meeting from 9:30 to 10:20 a.m., and then the Membership Committee Meeting from 10:30 to 11:50 a.m.

 

ABMA Convention Registration on Wednesday is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. At noon on Wednesday, the Finished Goods Static Display is open. ABMA offers active and affiliate members a chance to promote their finished broom, brush, roller and mop products via an unmanned static tabletop display. Times for this display are as follows: noon to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 7; and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on both Thursday, March 8, and Friday, March 9.

 

A Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting is set for noon to 12:50 p.m. on Wednesday, to be followed by a Safety & Standards Committee Meeting from 1 to 1:50 p.m.

 

This year’s ABMA Divisional Meetings are also slated for Wednesday. The Broom & Mop Division Meeting will convene from 2 until 2:50 p.m.; the Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting from 3 to 3:50 p.m.; the Paint Applicator Division Meeting from 4 to 4:50 p.m.; and the Suppliers Division Meeting from 5 to 5:30 p.m.

 

Technical presentations will be incorporated into this year’s first three divisional meetings. A representative from PelRay International, of San Antonio, TX, will discuss The Magic Of Broom Corn during the Broom & Mop Meeting, while an official from Zahoransky USA, of Sugar Grove, IL, will talk about Current Developments In Injection Mold Technology during the Industrial Maintenance Meeting. A technical presentation during the Paint Applicator Meeting will be presented by a representative from Purdy Corporation, of Portland, OR, titled Zero To Landfill. Each divisional meeting is open to everyone who attends the convention.

 

Wednesday evening’s events include the New Members & First Time Attendees Welcome Reception from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by the Welcoming Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Dress is business casual for both events.

 

A day earlier, on Tuesday, March 6, the Officers Finance Meeting will take place from 5 to 6 p.m., and will be followed by the 100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting from 7 to 9 p.m.

 

The main program to start Thursday, March 8, will be the Opening Business Session from 8 to 8:50 a.m. The event will feature a welcome by ABMA President Ian Moss, from Static Faction, Inc., of Salem, MA. Prior to the Business Session, a continental breakfast will be available from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration will open at 7:30 a.m. and remain until 2 p.m.

 

Following the Business Session there will be an ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute from 9 to 10:45 a.m. The event features Alan McLaren, who will present a program titled, Using Social Networking To Build Your Brand. McLaren has over 25 years of leadership experience in different aspects of business management.

 

A Suppliers Display set-up time is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, while the ABMA Golf Scramble Tournament will take place from 1 to 6 p.m. at The PGA National Golf Club. The tournament cost includes greens fees, golf cart rental, range balls and prizes. Participants are asked to make their own club rental arrangements directly by calling 800-863-2819 to be connected to the pro shop.

 

Thursday’s Mid-Convention Reception is slated for 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Dinner is open.

 

A full day of activities are planned for Friday, March 9, starting with a continental breakfast from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration is scheduled from 7:30 a.m. to noon.

 

One highlight will be the ABMA Suppliers Display, which will begin at 8 a.m. and run until noon. This event provides a showcase for ABMA members to see the latest products, ideas and components offered by exhibiting suppliers. In addition, the event is another opportunity for members to network.

 

From 9 to 10:30 a.m., meanwhile, the ABMA Companion Program will take place, featuring a session titled, Social Networking Do’s & Don’ts.

 

A buffet lunch is slated for noon until 1 p.m. and will be followed by bonus networking time from 2 to 5 p.m.

 

Friday evening’s featured event will be the Suppliers Reception, which takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. The theme is “Celebration Of The Importance Of Brushes To The Paint Artist.” The event features artist and entertainer Michael Israel. A live auction will take place immediately following Israel’s performance with proceeds to benefit the ABMA 100th Anniversary Project. The indoor event includes a plated dinner and an area for dancing. Business casual wear is encouraged.

 

The final day of the convention is Saturday, March 10, beginning with a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. and followed by the Closing Business Session and the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award presentation. This all takes place from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.

 

After the award presentation, Saturday’s ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute is scheduled from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. David Carson will present a program titled, Product Development From Birth To Shelf. Carson has more than 25 years of professional advanced design and hands-on development experience in a number of disciplines, with his degree being in mechanical design technology.

 

From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, the ABMA Board of Directors Luncheon and Meeting is scheduled. The final event of the 2012 ABMA Annual Convention will be the Board of Directors Dinner from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

Hotel, Dress And Weather Information

 

The PGA National Resort & Spa is located at 400 Avenue of the Champions, in Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418. The phone number for reservations is 1-800-863-2819.

 

For ABMA events, comfortable and casual dress is appropriate. Daytime attire is casual and sportswear is customary (golf shirts and slacks or shorts for men; slacks, shorts or skirts/dresses for women). Evening activities are “nice” informal or daytime business casual attire and may include sport coats for men; pantsuits, slacks, skirts/dresses for women.

 

Located in southeastern Florida, Palm Beach Gardens has average daytime temperatures during March in the high 70s. Nighttime temperatures average in the low 60s. Call 720-392-2262 or visit www.abma.org for additional information on this year’s ABMA Annual Convention.



 




95th Annual ABMA Convention Schedule Of Events

 

 Tuesday, March 6    
5 to 6 p.m.  
Officers Finance Meeting
7 to 9 p.m.  
100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting

Wednesday, March 7  
8 to 9:20 a.m.  
Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting
9:30 to 10:20 a.m.  
Public Relations Committee Meeting
10:30 to 11:50 a.m.  
Membership Committee Meeting
11 a.m. to 6 p.m.  
Registration / “Gathering Place”
Noon to 6 p.m.
Finished Goods Static Display
Noon to 12:50 p.m.  
Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting
1 to 1:50 p.m.   
Safety & Standards Committee Meeting
2 to 2:50 p.m.
Broom & Mop Division Meeting
& Technical Presentation by PelRay International
3 to 3:50 p.m.   
Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting
& Technical Presentation by Zahoransky USA
4 to 4:50 p.m. 
Paint Applicator Division Meeting
& Technical Presentation by Purdy Corporation
5 to 5:30 p.m.   
Suppliers Division Meeting
6 to 7 p.m.  
New Members & First-Time Attendees
Welcome Reception
Dress: Business Casual  
7 to 9 p.m.  
Welcoming Reception
Dress: Business Casual

Thursday, March 8  
7 to 8:30 a.m.   
Continental Breakfast
7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.  
Registration / “Gathering Place”
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Finished Goods Static Display
8 to 8:50 a.m.  
Opening Business Session - President’s Welcome



9 to 10:45 a.m.  

ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute

Speaker: Alan McLaren “Using Social Networking To

Build Your Brand”

11 a.m. to 5 p.m.   

Supplier Display Setup

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Lunch on Own

1 to 6 p.m.

Golf Scramble Tournament  

6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Mid-Convention Reception

7 p.m.

Dinner on Own

Friday, March 9  

7 to 7:45 a.m.  

All Exhibitor Display Setup

7 to 8:30 a.m.  

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m. to Noon  

Registration / “Gathering Place”

8 a.m. to Noon

ABMA Suppliers Display

8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Finished Goods Static Display

9 to 10:30 a.m.  

Companion Program — Social Networking Do’s & Don’ts

Noon to 1 p.m.

Buffet Lunch

2 to 5 p.m.  

Bonus Networking Time

7 to 10 p.m.  

Suppliers’ Reception

Theme: Celebration of the importance of brushes to the

paint artist, featuring Michael Israel. 

Saturday, March 10  

7:30 to 9 a.m.  

Continental breakfast

8:30 to 9:20 a.m.  

Closing Business Session

9:20 to 9:30 a.m.  

Innovation Award Presentation

9:30 to 10:30 a.m.  

ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute

Speaker: David Carson “Product Development From

Birth To Shelf”

11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  

Board of Directors Luncheon & Meeting

6:30 to 9:30 p.m.  

Board of Directors Dinner

 


 

Imports Mixed While Exports Mostly Down In Categories Outlined

 

import

Including complete list of November

Import/Export Statistics

 

By Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first 11 months of 2011 indicate raw material imports were up in two of the four categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first 11 months of 2010. For November 2011, raw material imports were also up in two of the four categories outlined, compared to November 2010.

 

Import totals for the first 11 months of 2011 were down in five of the eight finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2010. In November 2011, four of the eight categories outlined recorded increases, compared to November 2010.

 

RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 29,770 kilograms of hog bristle in November 2011, up 52 percent from 19,575 kilograms imported in November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 397,786 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, a 6 percent increase from 375,385 kilograms imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China sent 397,640 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011.

 

The average price per kilogram for November 2011 was $4.13, down 77 percent from the average price per kilogram for November 2010 of $18.02. The average price per kilogram for the first 11 months of 2011 was $9.31, up 14 percent from the average price per kilogram of $8.14 for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during November 2011 was 1.5 million, down 12 percent from 1.7 million for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 20.5 million broom and mop handles were imported, up 5 percent from 19.5 million for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

During the first 11 months of 2011, the United States received 9 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 4.2 million from China and 4.1 million from Honduras.

 

The average price per handle for November 2011 was 93 cents, up 26 percent from the average price for November 2010 of 74 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 84 cents, up 14 percent from 74 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Brush Backs

November 2011 imports of brush backs totaled 541,113, up 89 percent from the November 2010 total of 286,445 brush backs. During the first 11 months of 2011, 5.6 million brush backs were imported, down 16 percent from 6.7 million for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka shipped 2.8 million brush backs to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Canada shipped 2.4 million.

 

The average price per brush back was 46 cents during November 2011, down 33 percent from the average price for November 2010 of 69 cents. For the first 11 months of 2011, the average price per brush back was 48 cents, down 4 percent from 50 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during November 2011 was 2.3 million, down 18 percent from 2.8 million for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 29.3 million metal handles were imported, down 15 percent from 34.6 million for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

During the first 11 months of 2011, Italy shipped 12.2 million metal handles to the United States, while China sent 11.3 million and Spain shipped 4.8 million.

 

The average price per handle for November 2011 was 84 cents, up 45 percent from 58 cents for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 73 cents, up 40 percent from 52 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS


Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At Less Than 96 Cents

Imports of brooms of broom corn valued at less than 96 cents per broom during November 2011 totaled 9,960, up 15 percent from 8,628 brooms imported during November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 172,176 brooms of broom corn were imported, up 43 percent from 120,372 imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

All the brooms were imported from Mexico.

 

The average price per broom in November 2011 was 79 cents, down 4 percent from 82 cents for November 2010. The average price per broom for the first 11 months of 2011 was 81 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Brooms Of Broom Corn

Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 654,973 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during November 2011, up 10 percent from 597,417 for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 7.9 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down 5 percent from 8.3 million imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Mexico shipped 7.6 million brooms to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Honduras sent the remainder.


The average price per broom for November 2011 was $2.36, down 6 percent from the average price for November 2010 of $2.51. The average price per broom for the first 11 months of 2011 was $2.39, down 2 percent from $2.45 for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during November 2011 was 117,152, down 30 percent from 167,392 brooms and brushes imported during November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 1.5 million brooms and brushes were imported, down 40 percent from 2.5 million imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Sri Lanka exported 902,065 brooms and brushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Vietnam sent 248,840 and China shipped 151,251.


The average price per unit for November 2011 was $1.30, down 35 percent from $2.01 for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was $1.27, an decrease of 16 percent from the average price recorded for the first 11 months of 2010 of $1.52.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 76.3 million toothbrushes in November 2011, up 3 percent from 73.8 million imported in November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 821.7 million toothbrushes were imported, an decrease of 2 percent from 839.9 million imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China sent 569.6 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011. Among the other countries shipping toothbrushes to the United States were Switzerland, 74.6 million; Vietnam, 60.4 million; India, 36.4 million; and Germany, 28.4 million.

 

The average price per toothbrush for November 2011 was 24 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 23 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Hairbrushes

November 2011 imports of hairbrushes totaled 4 million, down 7 percent from the November 2010 total of 4.3 million hairbrushes. During the first 11 months of 2011, 47.4 million hairbrushes were imported, up slightly from 46.7 million for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China shipped 46.7 million hairbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011.

(Continued on Top Right Column)



The average price per hairbrush was 31 cents during November 2011, up 11 percent from the average price of 28 cents for November 2010. For the first 11 months of 2011, the average price per hairbrush was 28 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 12.4 million shaving brushes in November 2011, down 3 percent from 12.8 million imported in November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 108.7 million shaving brushes were imported, up 1 percent from 107.7 million imported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China sent 50.1 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Mexico sent 31.6 million and South Korea shipped 14.7 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for November 2011 was 7 cents, down 30 percent from 10 cents for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 11 cents, down 15 percent from 13 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during November 2011 was 3 million, down 43 percent from 5.3 million recorded for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 54.8 million paint rollers were imported, down 6 percent from 58.1 million during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China sent 40.1 million paint rollers to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Mexico exported 11.2 million and Germany shipped 3.1 million.

 

The average price per paint roller for November 2011 was 47 cents, up 31 percent from 36 cents for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 43 cents, up 1 cent from the average price recorded for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 16.6 million paintbrushes during November 2011, up 22 percent from 13.6 million paintbrushes imported during November 2010. Paintbrush imports for the first 11 months of 2011 were 206.6 million, down 9 percent from 226.5 million recorded for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

China shipped 166.7 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2011.

 

The average price per paintbrush for November 2011 was 23 cents, down 30 percent from the average price for November 2010 of 33 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 30 cents, up 11 percent from the average price of 27 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

EXPORTS

 

Export totals for the first 11 months of 2011 were down in three of the five categories outlined, compared to the first 11 months of 2010. In November 2011, three of the five categories outlined also reported decreases in exports, compared to November 2010.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 5,844 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during November 2011, down 16 percent from the November 2010 total of 6,958 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first 11 months of 2011 were 75,869 dozen, down 17 percent from 90,907 dozen for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

The United States sent 30,992 dozen brooms and brushes to Canada during the first 11 months of 2011 and 13,300 dozen to The United Kingdom.

 

The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $39.06 in November 2011, up 7 percent from $36.42 for November 2010. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first 11 months of 2011 was $50.41, an increase of 47 percent from the average price per dozen for the first 11 months of 2010 of $34.36.

 

Toothbrushes

During November 2011, the United States exported 8.8 million toothbrushes, down 13 percent from the total recorded in November 2010 of 10.1 million. During the first 11 months of 2011, 90.8 million toothbrushes were exported, down 13 percent from 104.1 million exported during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

The United States exported 37.7 million toothbrushes to Canada during the first 11 months of 2011, while sending 15 million toothbrushes to Mexico.

 

The average price per toothbrush for November 2011 was 62 cents, up 9 percent from the average price for November 2010 of 57 cents. The average price per toothbrush for the first 11 months of 2011 was 61 cents, down 8 percent from 66 cents for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 1.3 million shaving brushes during November 2011, down 48 percent from 2.5 million shaving brushes exported for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 20.5 million shaving brushes were exported, down 8 percent from 22.3 million during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Mexico imported 5.5 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Brazil imported 5.2 million, and Canada received 4.5 million.

 

The average price per shaving brush for November 2011 was 91 cents, up 82 percent from the average price for November 2010 of 50 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was 63 cents, down 7 percent from 68 cents recorded for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Artist brushes

November 2011 exports of artist brushes totaled 1.1 million, up 103 percent from the November 2010 total of 540,631 artist brushes. During the first 11 months of 2011, 10.4 million artist brushes were exported, up 46 percent from 7.1 million for the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Canada received 5.1 million artist brushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2011, while Brazil imported 1.3 million.

 

The average price per artist brush was $2.36 during November 2011, down 17 percent from the average price for November 2010 of $2.86. For the first 11 months of 2011, the average price per artist brush was $2.56, down 16 percent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2010 of $3.05.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during November 2011 was 200,151, up 39 percent from 144,282 for November 2010. During the first 11 months of 2011, 2.2 million paintbrushes were exported, up 16 percent from 1.9 million during the first 11 months of 2010.

 

Canada imported 1.5 million paintbrushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2011.

 

The average price per paintbrush for November 2011 was $10.30, down 27 percent from $14.12 for November 2010. The average price for the first 11 months of 2011 was $9.84, down 17 percent from $11.85 recorded for the first 11 months of 2010.

Click here for entire November Export/Import Statistics

 

 

deal

 

United States Imports 739 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In 2011

 

By Harrell Kerkhoff, Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

 

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, 56 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States during December 2011. The government also reported that the value of this import was $127,608, with a cost per ton of $2,279 ($1.14 per pound).

 

All broom corn imported during December arrived from Mexico. The 56 short ton mark was higher compared to one year prior, when just 24 short tons of broom corn were imported to the United States during December 2010.

 

Final figures for 2011 show that 739 short tons of broom corn entered the United States during the year, with a total value of $1,797,448. The reported cost per ton for this broom corn was $2,432 ($1.22 per pound). In comparison, 1,017 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States during 2010. Total value of this import was $2,733,000, with a cost per ton of $2,687 ($1.34 per pound).

 

All but 9 of the 739 short tons of broom corn imported into the United States in 2011 came from Mexico. The remaining broom corn arrived from Chile in February.

 

Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, said the end-of-the-year U.S. broom corn import tally of 739 short tons indicates to him that the level of natural broom manufacturing in the United States continues to decline.

 

Bart Pelton


“I keep hoping (U.S. broom corn) imports will level out at some point, but it hasn’t happened yet,” Pelton said. “I would say 56 imported short tons for December is accurate. U.S. broom corn consumption is running around 600 to 800 short tons a year, so we are going to see an average of 50 to 70 short tons per month enter the country.”

 

Pelton, however, said the total value for December’s imported broom corn as reported by the U.S. government is too low to be accurate, even for raw broom corn.

 

When interviewed on February 22, Pelton added that Mexican broom corn pricing had increased by 10 cents a pound one month prior, but the price had not moved much since.

 

“Hurl is still in tight supply. A disproportionate amount of broom corn inventory in Mexico right now is of insides. I expect (Mexican broom corn) prices to go higher between now (late February) and when the new Mexican crop is available (this summer from the Torreon region),” Pelton said.

 

He noted that in 2011, all but 9 short tons of broom corn imported into the United States arrived from Mexico. Several years ago, however, broom corn imports from Europe were quite normal.

 

Pelton explained that pricing issues have prevented interest in importing European broom corn to the United States. A smaller than normal acreage of crop grown in Europe during 2011 also played a role in no reported broom corn coming across the Atlantic Ocean to U.S. ports.

 

“We even received inquiries from (companies) in Europe looking to possibly purchase Mexican broom corn,” Pelton said.

 

“Years ago, we did some work in Eastern Europe and Africa that promoted additional broom corn production, but the market just isn’t big enough anymore to continue that effort.

 

“At the moment, I don’t see anything preventing Mexico from remaining the primary supplier of broom corn to the United States.”

 

Pelton added that he has not heard of any Apatzingan-grown broom corn entering Cadereyta, in Mexico, for processing this year. Harvesting of this Mexican broom corn usually starts in February.

 

Regarding yucca fiber, used during the production of some brooms, Pelton said this market remains fairly steady with no major changes taking place. Lead times are running at two to four weeks as of late February.

 

One major challenge still facing broom corn and related markets, meanwhile, is the ongoing security issues being experienced in northern Mexico from members of various drug cartels. Pelton said kidnappings and other violence remain a top concern while traveling in the Cadereyta and Torreon areas of Mexico.

 

“People are afraid to travel to these areas. It’s definitely keeping business (in general) from expanding. Overall, the Mexican economy is doing surprisingly well considering the problems the country is having with this violence. However, Mexico could be doing so much better if this wasn’t going on,” Pelton said. “The (Mexican) government is fighting the problem, but I don’t think there has been much success. Sooner or later it will get better, but I don’t see any end in sight right now.”


(Continued on Top Right Column)

Despite this problem, Pelton said overall business at his company has been good as of late.
“Business is up over last year at this time, and last year was better than the previous year. I think our industry, as a whole, is gradually improving as time goes by,” he said.

 

Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, agreed with Pelton that December’s 56 short ton import mark looked accurate, but that the import’s total value was way too low. Caddy had the same feeling about the year-end figure of 739 short tons and the total value that averaged $1.22 per pound.

 

“I don’t dispute the tonnage (739 short tons), but ($1.22 per pound) is on the low side for price even over the course of a year,” Caddy said.

 

He added the 739 short ton mark for 2011 was the lowest yearly U.S. broom corn import total that he could ever recall.

“The broom corn crop out of Mexico during 2011 was not very big in total tonnage. It was very good in quality, however,” Caddy said.

 

“The low crop acreage for 2011 is one of the reasons why Mexican broom corn prices are increasing, along with the peso strengthening against the U.S. dollar.”

 

When asked if there will be enough available broom corn in Mexico until this summer’s first harvest in Torreon, Caddy said this will largely depend on the level of demand.

 

“Right now (as of late February) U.S. demand has been decent. We (at R.E. Caddy) have been bringing in material and moving it out fairly quickly,” he said. “I can see it possibly getting to the point where it will be hard to meet demand. However, it’s not there yet.”

 

Caddy noted that some lengths of Mexican broom corn are currently hard to come by, particularly 12- and 14-inch hurl.

 

“Overall, in terms of getting broom corn thus far, we are not at a crisis point,” he said.

 

Like Pelton, Caddy has not heard of any broom corn being harvested this February in the Apatzingan region of Mexico.

 

“It would be nice if a planting did take place, taking pressure off a bit for everybody who uses broom corn,” Caddy said.

 

When asked about current Mexican broom corn pricing, Caddy commented on February 24 that it’s been rising fairly significantly.
“When there are increases like this, it sometimes makes people cut back on their demand. I hope (prices) don’t go up much more,” Caddy said.

 

Regarding the yucca fiber market, he added that stability remains in place, while lead times are three to four weeks. Quality has also been good.

 

Caddy explained what constitutes good quality for yucca fiber.

 

Richard Caddy


“Like any fiber, the length must be cut correctly. You don’t want shorts. With yucca, there is also an additional step where it has to be properly shredded. It should be wider than broom corn,” Caddy said.

 

“Sometimes yucca is processed so finely that it becomes limp and doesn’t have proper strength. And yet, you don’t want it to be thick like palmyra stalks. The good processors can get that correct width so (yucca fiber) is narrow enough to blend in with broom corn, but not so narrow that it becomes weak.

 

“It’s also important that the fiber has good color. Green is better than brown, although yucca fiber goes inside the broom so color is often not as critical. Yucca fiber can also be dyed.”

 

Also like any fiber, Caddy added that yucca fiber must be protected against the weather during its processing, especially guarding against wet conditions.

 

“When done correctly, a manufacturer can put a fairly reasonable amount of yucca fiber inside a broom and have it look nice, while also providing a good sweeping tool,” Caddy said.

 

When asked to comment on the level of overall business at his company as of late, Caddy classified December, January and the first part of February as being “pretty decent.”

 

He added that demand for many types of fibers remains steady for the most part. A top concern, meanwhile, is the prospect of higher fiber prices which could discourage future buying.

 

“We will just have to see what happens,” Caddy said.

 

Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, was unavailable for comment for this month’s broom corn dealer survey.

 

 

 


 


asasas



Brush Manufacturers Attend Mill-Rose 49th Annual Luncheon

 

Brush manufacturers and suppliers from around the world gathered for the 49th annual Mill-Rose Brush Makers luncheon, January 20 in downtown Cleveland, OH.

 

Over 75 representatives from the United States and countries as far away as England, Germany, Mexico and Canada attended the event, hosted by Mentor, OH-based The Mill-Rose Company.

 

Shown among those attending the 49th annual Mill-Rose Brush Makers luncheon are, left to right, Pat Gardner, Ohio Brush; Kimberly Baldi, Cleveland Wood Products; Laura Herbet, Monahan Fillaments and Dennise Silva, PMM.

 

Manufacturers and suppliers gathered during the week before the luncheon to discuss business trends, opportunities and other topics related to the industry.

 

Brushes manufactured by these companies are used in virtually every type of industry around the world. Applications include makeup/mascara brushes, hair brushes, floor sweeping and polishing brushes, gun cleaning brushes, car wash brushes, copier toner brushes, brooms, paint brushes and special brushes used in the medical field.

 

Local and regional companies attending the event included Malish Corporation, Precision Brush, Osborn Brush, Sherwin Williams, Cleveland Wood Products, Spiral Brush, Brushes Corp., Wooster Brush, Phillips Brush and The Mill-Rose Company.

 

The Mill-Rose Company is a U.S. manufacturer of twisted-in-wire brushes used in all types of industry throughout the world, according to the company. Mill-Rose is a family-owned organization, now in its third generation. Mill-Rose has had significant growth from its beginnings in 1919, and today operates manufacturing and warehouse facilities throughout the United States and Mexico.

 

Also pictured at the Mill-Rose luncheon are Jeff Malish, Malish Corporation and Greg Miller, Mill-Rose.


A 64,000-square-foot production facility in Mentor and a 33,000-square-foot production facility in Mexico feature manufacturing techniques and quality-control programs. Manufacturing is complemented by a 70,000-square-foot U.S. distribution center in Mentor.

 



Zahoransky Now Offering 2 New Machines For Toothbrush Segment

 

Zahoransky AG, of Todtnau, Germany, has two new machines for the toothbrush production segment — the Z.SHARK 8 and the Z.SHARK twin. The company says these machines provide maximum performance and satisfy the requirements coming from the Asian market.

 

As a high-performance machine for tufting toothbrushes with single or multiple component blocks, company spokespeople say the Z.SHARK 8 delivers quality with attractive pricing. The universal version high stacking magazine, which is adjustable in length and width, makes the unit suitable for most single-component toothbrush blocks.

 

Z.SHARK 8


Zahoransky says that up to three different colors can be processed by means of a manually-operated triple material container. The continuous operation — without standstill and without reduction of speed between the ejection of a tufted brush and the insertion of a new brush head — helps ensure high efficiency.

 

Depending on the hole field, up to 1,800 brushes per hour can be produced with an output of 850 bundles per minute. At the same time, the 5.7-inch color touch screen enables simple production of programs for the most diverse toothbrush samples, according to Zahoransky.



Z.SHARK twin


 

Meanwhile, the new Z.SHARK twin is manually operated and can be completely operated by two persons. The brush blocks are inserted into the cycle belt. Complex toothbrush blocks with TPE on the head and handle can also be processed by means of this procedure.

 

The fully-automatic input for tufting is efficient and reliable. The triple material container provides the required filament in up to three different colors.

 

After tufting, a gripper removes the brushes from the turret and transfers them to the finishing machine. Zahoransky spokespeople say this substantially reduces the effort for internal logistics. At the same time, the maximum assembly with 16 processing stations enables the production of complex topographies with end-rounding quality.

 

The Z.SHARK twin has an output of up to 2,000 bundles per minute, which allows for the production of approximately 60 toothbrushes per minute, according to the company.

Visit www.zahoransky-group.com for more information.

 

 

 




Shurhold Offers New Microfiber Bonnet For Company’s Dual Action Polisher


Shurhold’s Dual Action Polisher, designed for RV owners, now features a microfiber bonnet for a high quality finish.

Shurhold's Dual Action Polisher


Fitting snugly over the 6.5-inch buffing pad, the bonnet features a lining that serves as a vapor barrier to prevent a wet waxing pad from leaking through. According to the company, this can save time since users can place this right over the used wax pad to buff out extra wax. At a speed setting of 1-2, the Dual Action Polisher can buff Shurhold’s Pro Polish to a showroom shine, according to the company.

 

Shurhold states it’s dedicated to educating owners on RV value preservation. Inventor of the One Handle Does It All system, Shurhold manufactures specialty care items and accessories to clean, polish and detail.


Visit www.shurhold.com/rv for more information.




Deutzmann Named Unger’s European Division Managing Director

 

Unger Enterprises has appointed Torsten Deutzmann as managing director of its European division. Deutzmann,
who first joined Unger in 1995 as a marketing assistant, has performed a variety of roles with the company, most recently
as general manager.

Torsten Deutzmann


During his time at Unger, Deutzmann has been involved in shaping strategic direction, launching products such as HiFlo™ Pure Water cleaning systems, and developing and growing the sales force. He will now oversee all activities in Europe, Africa and Asia.

 

Unger provides cleaning solutions in more than 80 countries worldwide, and has offices and manufacturing facilities in both the United States and Germany.


Visit www.ungerglobal.com for more information.

 



Nexstep Commercial Products Offers MaxiRough®
Mop Buckets & Wringers In Red And Blue

 

Nexstep Commercial Products (exclusive licensee of O-Cedar) has announced its
MaxiRough® Mop Buckets & Wringers are now available in red and blue.

Product features include:
• Ergonomic Sidepress Wringer Handle Design — Mop wringing is now done from in front of/behind the bucket
rather than the side and reduces back strain. The curved grip handle allows user to easily steer the bucket.
For use with up to 32 ounce mops;
• Wringer Hook — Holds mop stick securely in place when not in use;
• Upper Rim Slot — Makes securing scraper and putty knife safe and easy; and,
• Larger Capacity Bucket — Holds 35 quarts to help make cleaning large areas quick and easy.



Visit www.ocedarcommercial.com for more information.