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By Rick Mullen
Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine

Associate Editor


A common mantra among janitorial/sanitary distributor salespeople is, “If I could only get in front of the decision makers — if I could just spend a few minutes in front of them, I think I could convert them,” according to E. Jeff Gardner, president of Maximum Performance Group, LLC.

 

Speaking to an audience of cleaning industry professionals recently, Gardner outlined a process that he guaranteed would help salespeople vastly increase opportunities to meet with decision makers, resulting in more sales. He titled his presentation, “Harness the Power of Referrals.”

 

“I’m going to share with you a process that is not just theoretical — it is something that works,” he said. “Referrals work. Referrals convert to customers 50 to 70 percent of the time. No other sales or marketing technique or strategy comes close to that, according to www.insidesales.com.

 

“Very few salespeople actually work referrals.

My goal in life is to always be looking for that edge. What is that edge I can take advantage of
to sell more?”

 

Gardner listed five basic steps salespeople use to acquire customers. They are:
■ Get an appointment with a prospect
decision maker;
■ Meet with the decision maker and uncover needs;
■ Present a solution;
■ Gain commitment; and,
■ Start serving and growing the new customer.

 

“The ‘choke point’ for many salespeople is getting that first appointment,” Gardner said. “It is one of the toughest things to get someone to give you some time out of his or her schedule and actually listen,

talk with you and answer your questions.”

 

Gardner said referrals are a highly effective way for salespeople to get past the “choke point” of getting

an appointment with a decision maker.

 

“I’m not going to tell you to not ever cold call,”
he told the audience. “However, making cold
calls is a lot of effort for nominal results.”

 

Gardner said it typically takes 10 cold calls to get an appointment with a buyer, and, on average, one out of five appointments result in a new customer — that translates to a 20 percent close rate.

 

“You have to call on 50 people to get one new account. That’s a lot of effort,” Gardner said. “If you have a good book of business, where do you find the time to make that many calls?”

 

Gardner said in today’s marketplace there are more and more barriers to getting first appointments.
He listed the following:
■ Voice mail and “gatekeepers;”
■ Building security/no soliciting policies;
■ Anti-solicitation laws relating to texts, email and other merging media;
■ Perception that salespeople don’t provide
value; and,
■ Not enough time in the day: buyers are busy
with other tasks.

 

He also defined a sales referral, which takes place when an existing customer or other business associate recommends and provides the name and contact information of a prospect decision maker to the salesperson.

 

It generally takes one to two referrals to get a first appointment with a prospect decision maker.

 

Furthermore, it takes a average of five prospect first appointments to get one new customer. Again, a 20 percent close rate, Gardner said.

 

“That’s one-fifth the time it takes to generate a new customer making cold calls. Referrals are a timesaver,” he said. “Those of you who are in a sales leadership role should start measuring, when you get back to your business, conversion ratio. How many first appointments did my salespeople have with new prospect decision makers that turned into customers? That is probably the most important number you have.

 

“I almost don’t care how many cold calls you make. You can make 100 cold calls to get one appointment. What I want to find out is, when you get an appointment, what are you doing or not doing to convert that to a customer.”


New Customer Conversion

Gardner outlined results of a test conducted with several salespeople from five distribution companies, who used referrals to gain new business. Following is a representative sampling of results over a four-week period:

 

Salesperson No. 1:
■ Referral requests: 3;
■ Referrals received: 3;
■ First appointments: 1; and,
■ New customers: 1.
The result: 100 percent new customer
conversion ratio.

 

Salesperson No. 2:
■ Referral requests: 6;
■ Referrals received: 10;
■ First appointments: 6; and,
■ New customers: 2.
The result: 33 percent new customer conversion ratio.

 

Salesperson No. 3:
■ Referral requests: 20;
■ Referrals received: 19;
■ First appointments: 12; and
■ New customers: 4.
The result: 33 percent new customer conversion ratio.

 

Salesperson No. 4:
■ Referral requests: 9;
■ Referrals received: 9;
■ First appointments: 8; and,
■ New customers: 8.
The result: 100 percent new customer conversion ratio.

 

Salesperson No. 5:
■ Referral requests: 5;
■ Referrals received: 4;
■ First appointments: 4; and,
■ New customers: 3.
The result: 75 percent new customer conversion ratio.

 

Sales person No. 6:
■ Referral requests: 1;
■ Referrals received: 7 (all from the same person);
■ First appointments: 3; and,
■ New customers: 2.
The result: 66 percent new customer conversion ratio.

 

“By asking for, and following up on referrals, prospecting time is reduced dramatically,” Gardner said. “In addition, using referrals is easier on the ego — not as much rejection as
cold calling.

 

“We did some research on salespeople, and we found, on average, they were only bringing in fewer than two new accounts per month,” Gardner said. “It should be more than that. We need to bring in more new accounts.”

 

Gardner said when he hears business owners complaining that their salespeople aren’t making enough cold calls, he tells them to go out with their people and make calls with them.

 

“It is not easy,” he said. “I went out with a salesperson recently and we were making a cold call. I said, ‘Let me do it.’ He said, ‘You’re kidding.’ I said, ‘No. Why would I be kidding? I’m your coach. How could I not perform and show you how? I have no magic answers. Let my try it.’

 

“So, I did it. It was a fairly good call. It went OK. He said he has never had a sales manager or a coach actually make the call. They always watched him make the call.

 

“Seeking new sales is hard. You have to be ready to fail. In sales, you don’t win every time, but you have to get out there and try.”

 

Gardner listed the following advantages of

using referrals:
■ Better quality prospects;
“If you get a new referral, ask some questions about the referred company. Get more information. Get a sense of who the person is you will be meeting,” Gardner said.

 

■ Shorter sales cycle;
“Establish a reputation. The person I’m being referred to knows I’m doing business with somebody who is a business friend of their’s, so he or she at least knows I’m somewhat credible — I’m not just some commissioned sales guy knocking at the door,” Gardner said.

 

■ More time to serve and grow current customer base; and,


■ Bottom line: more new customers.

 

“Because you are not spending all that time prospecting, you also have more time to service
and work with current customers,” Gardner said.

 

(Continued in top right column.)

Jeff Gardner

Jeff Gardner

 

 

Maximum Performance Referral System

Gardner outlined what he calls the Maximum Performance Referral System.

 

■ Identify and manage your referral sources;
■ Get your “attitude” right;
■ Develop and practice your referral scripts;
■ What to do when you receive a referral; and,
■ Contacting the referral.

 

Identify and manage your referral sources: “The first thing you want to do is start segmenting your data base,” Gardner said. “Think about anyone who has given you a referral in the past. Think about your best customers you work with every day — people who are buying from you.”

 

Get your “attitude” right: “You must get your

attitude right. You have to ask first. You have to

feel comfortable with asking for referrals,” Gardner said. “Here are some interesting statistics —

10 percent of your customers will give you a referral without being asked. Those are the

ones you are getting now. 10 percent of your customers will never give you a referral, for whatever reason. 80 percent of your customers will give you a referral if you ask. You’re missing out on that 80 percent if you are not asking.”

 

Gardner explained the law of reciprocation: “You are going to a restaurant that has a set of double doors and, as you are walking up, a stranger opens the door for you. What do you do at the second set of doors? You open it for him or her. That is part of human nature — people want to help others. Your customers are waiting for you to ask for a referral. Do not miss out on the opportunity.”

 

Develop and practice referral scripts: “Salespeople tell me, ‘I don’t believe in scripts because I don’t want to sound scripted,’” Gardner said. “Salespeople who don’t script themselves are never going to make it to the top. The best salespeople are highly scripted, but they don’t sound scripted — that’s the key.”

 

Gardner suggested some scripts salespeople can use when seeking referrals.

 

“This is my most basic: ‘I’ve enjoyed working with you (this is a current customer) during the past couple of years. Thank you for your business. I really appreciate it,’” Gardner said.

 

Gardner suggested a script for salespeople who have not asked for referrals in the past.

 

“I have had salespeople say to me, ‘All of a sudden I’m going to ask people for referrals? I’ve never done that before,’” Gardner said. “The following script can be used in that situation: ‘I have recently made a commitment to utilize referrals as a way to meet new customers. That way I can continue to serve my current customers.’

 

“Then just ask, ‘Do you have anybody who might appreciate our services? Who among your business associates do you think would find it valuable?’ Go to your best customers and ask. I guarantee you will get referrals if you ask.”

 

Another script Gardner shared is what he called “the satisfaction check.”

 

“Go to your best customers and ask, ‘What do you like about doing business with us? What do you like the best?’” Gardner said. “A customer might say, ‘You guys are so easy to work with. I really appreciate the service.’ At this point, you want to say, ‘What is it you like about the service. What is it that we do that you like?’ We want the customer to get specific and quantifiable.

 

“He or she might answer, ‘Whenever I have a question, I always get a quick answer and that saves me a lot of time.’ This is somewhat vague. I want to quantify that, so I might say, ‘I’m curious, how much time do you think you save on a day-to-day and/or weekly basis?’ I want the customer to tell me two hours or one hour, whatever it happens to be, and then I thank them and ask for a referral.

 

“Then, you can say to the person to whom you were referred, ‘I was talking to Bob and he told me we saved him a lot of time. We are great at communication. It helps him to know what products are coming. We are able to solve this problem and that problem.’”

 

Gardner said the following script is one of his favorites upon receiving a referral to a potentially large account.

 

“A customer, Adam, gives me the referral,” Gardner said. “I say, ‘Why don’t you and I and your buddy, Steve, get together for lunch. I’ll buy. It’s a great way for us to meet each other and we can talk business, and if it goes anywhere, cool.’

 

“At some point during the lunch, I guarantee his friend, Steve, is going to say, ‘Tell me about your company. Tell me what you can do for me. I know Adam does business with you and says some nice things about you. How can you help us?’ I then turn to Adam and say, ‘Why don’t you tell Steve what we do for you.’”

 

The following script is one Gardner suggested when seeking a referral from a new customer:

 

“You can say, ‘I’m happy we have started working together. It is really incredible. I appreciate it. I want to thank you for the business. I’m looking forward to a long-term relationship,’” Gardner said. “And then you just ask the customer, ‘By the way, who else do you think might be interested in our services?’”

 

In another scenario, a salesperson calls on a decision maker, but is unable to convert this particular person into a customer. Nonetheless, there still is the opportunity to receive a referral.

 

“If you had a positive meeting with a prospect and he or she is not able to make a change for whatever reason, you can say, ‘I understand this is not a good fit for you at this time," Gardner said. "Hopefully, we can work together in the future. Do you know anybody in this office building or in this industrial park or in this area who might be a good fit for us?’”

 

What to do when you receive a referral/ Contacting the referral: “When somebody gives you a referral and you say to them, ‘I promise I will follow up — you can rely on me,’ immediately, when you get back to your office, send him or her a referral gift with a handwritten thank you card,” Gardner said. “The card could say, ‘Thank you so much for the referral. Enclosed is a token of my appreciation.’”

 

Gardner shared an incident concerning a salesperson who had given him a referral. He had thanked her by sending a box of chocolates.

 

“That salesperson came up to me recently and said, ‘Jeff, I’ll never forget that box of chocolates you sent me seven years ago when I gave you that referral,’” Gardner said. “It doesn’t have to be an expensive gift — $10, $15, maybe $25 at the most. One of the things I give, because I’m in the education business, is a $15 or $25 gift card to Barnes & Noble. One of the distributors we work with gives car washes. It’s not about the money.

 

“Too many people use this system and they don’t send a gift unless they get an order from the referral. It is not the referrer’s fault that you didn’t close the deal. You want to reward the behavior of giving you referrals. So, give the person giving you a referral a nice little gift with a handwritten card. Also, hand address the outside of the envelope and use a self-adhesive stamp — don’t run it through a meter. In general, in today’s world, a handwritten note is going to surprise him or her. You will be making an impression.”

 

Contact: Maximum Performance Group,
453 Providence Road, Palatine, IL 60074.
Phone: 847-202-1705.
Email: jeff@mpg91.com.
Website: www.mpg91.com.


 






Imports Mixed, Exports Down
For First 11 Months Of 2016

import

Rick Mullen, Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine Associate Editor

 

U.S. government trade figures for the first 11 months of 2016 indicated raw material imports were down in three categories outlined: hog bristle, broom and mop handles and metal handles compared to the first 11 months of 2015. For November 2016, two categories outlined reported increases: hog bristle and brush backs, compared to November 2015.


Import totals for the first 11 months of 2016 were up in five finished goods categories outlined: toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers, paintbrushes and upright brooms, compared to the first 11 months of 2015. In November 2016, four categories outlined recorded increases: toothbrushes, hairbrushes, paint rollers and upright brooms, compared to November 2015.


– RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS –


Hog Bristle

The United States imported 25,745 kilograms of hog bristle in November 2016, up 84 percent from 13,985 kilograms imported in November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 203,938 kilograms of hog bristle were imported, down 19 percent from
251,327 kilograms imported during the first 11 months of 2015.


China sent 202,960 kilograms of hog bristle to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per kilogram for November 2016 was $24.11, down 28 percent from the average price per kilogram for November 2015 of $33.59. The average price per kilogram for the first 11 months
of 2016 was $23.95, up 21 percent from the

average price per kilogram of $19.72 for the first
11 months of 2015.

 

Broom And Mop Handles

The import total of broom and mop handles during November 2016 was 1.4 million, down 7 percent from 1.5 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 15.8 million broom and mop handles were imported, down 5 percent from 16.6 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


During the first 11 months of 2016, the United States received 7.8 million broom and mop handles from Brazil, 4.9 million from Honduras and 2.1 million
from China.


The average price per handle for November 2016 was $1, up 13 percent from the average for November 2015 of 87 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 90 cents, down 5 percent from 95 cents for the first 11 months of 2015.


Brush Backs

November 2016 imports of brush backs totaled 662,171, up 16 percent from 571,017 for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 6.7 million brush backs were imported, up 3 percent from 6.5 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


Sri Lanka sent 3.2 million brush backs to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while Canada shipped 2.6 million.


The average price per brush back was 50 cents during November 2016, down 1 cent from the average price for November 2015. For the first 11 months of 2016, the average price per brush back was 46 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

Metal Handles

The import total of metal handles during November 2016 was 1.7 million, down 26 percent from 2.3 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 24 million metal handles were imported, down 4 percent from 25 million for the
first 11 months of 2015.


During the first 11 months of 2016, China exported 10.2 million metal handles to the United States, while Spain sent 9.5 million and Italy shipped 3.2 million.


The average price per handle for November 2016 was $1.09, up 6 percent from the average price for November 2015 of $1.03. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 91 cents, down 7 percent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015 of 98 cents.

 

– FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS –

Brooms Of Broom Corn
Valued At More Than 96 Cents

The United States imported 569,779 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during November 2016, down 7 percent from 610,876 for November 2015. During the first
11 months of 2016, 6.9 million brooms of broom
corn were imported, the same as for the first 11 months of 2015.


Mexico shipped nearly all of the brooms to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per broom for November 2016 was $2.29, down 6 percent from $2.44 for November 2015. The average price per broom for the first 11 months of 2016 was $2.47, down 2 percent from
the average price for the first 11 months of 2015
of $2.53.

 

Brooms & Brushes of Vegetable Material

The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during November 2016 was 240,935, down 23 percent from 312,009 brooms and brushes imported during November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 3.2 million brooms and brushes were imported, down 40 percent from 5.3 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


Sri Lanka exported 1.6 million brooms and brushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while Canada sent 642,643.


The average price per unit for November 2016 was $1.55, up 18 percent from the average price for November 2015 of $1.31. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was $1.18, up 15 percent from $1.03 for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

Toothbrushes

The United States imported 85.4 million toothbrushes in November 2016, up 14 percent from 74.6 million imported in November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 1 billion toothbrushes were imported, up 6 percent from 942.1 million imported during the first 11 months of 2015.


China sent 760.1 million toothbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per toothbrush for November 2016 was 21 cents, down 9 percent from the average price for November 2015 of 23 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 22 cents, down 8 percent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015 of 24 cents.

 

 

Hairbrushes

November 2016 imports of hairbrushes totaled 4.3 million, up 26 percent from 3.4 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 42.1 million hairbrushes were imported, up less than 1 percent from 41.9 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


China shipped 41.6 million hairbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per hairbrush was 24 cents during November 2016, down 20 percent from 30 cents for November 2015. For the first 11 months of 2016, the average price per hairbrush was 25 cents, the same as for the first 11 months of 2015.

Shaving Brushes

The United States imported 5.2 million shaving brushes in November 2016, down 5 percent from 5.5 million imported in November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 71.3 million shaving brushes were imported, down 9 percent from 78.3 million imported during the first 11 months of 2015.


China sent 49.5 million shaving brushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while Italy shipped 7.2 million.


The average price per shaving brush for November 2016 was 11 cents, down 15 percent from the average price for November 2015 of 13 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 13 cents, up 18 percent from 11 cents for the first 11 months of 2015.


(Continued on Top Right Column)


Paint Rollers

The import total of paint rollers during November 2016 was 4.3 million, up 16 percent from 3.7 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 63 million paint rollers were imported, up 3 percent from 61.4 million during the first 11 months of 2015.


China sent 51.3 million paint rollers to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per paint roller for November 2016 was 48 cents, down 23 percent from the average price for November 2015 of 62 cents. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 49 cents, down 6 percent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015 of 52 cents.

 

Paintbrushes

U.S. companies imported 17.3 million paintbrushes during November 2016, down 1 percent from 17.5 million for November 2015. Paintbrush imports for the first 11 months of 2016 were 231.8 million, up
2 percent from 227.1 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


China shipped 217.7 million paintbrushes to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per paintbrush for November 2016 was 28 cents, down 22 percent from 36 cents for November 2015. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was 30 cents, down 9 percent from 33 cents for the first 11 months of 2015.

 


Upright Brooms

The total import of upright brooms for November 2016 was 1.5 million, up 15 percent from 1.3 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 15.4 million upright brooms were imported, up 8 percent from 14.2 million imported during the first 11 months of 2015.


China sent 13.4 million upright brooms to the United States during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per broom for November 2016 was $1.43, down 10 percent from the average

price for November 2015 of $1.59. The average price per broom for the first 11 months of 2016 was $1.36, down 7 percent from $1.46 for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

– EXPORTS –


Export totals for the first 11 months of 2016 were down in three categories outlined: brooms and brushes of vegetable materials, shaving brushes and artist brushes, compared to the first 11 months of 2015.


In November 2016, three categories outlined reported increases: brooms and brushes of vegetable materials, shaving brushes and paintbrushes, compared to November 2015.

 

Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials

The United States exported 9,042 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during November 2016, up 58 percent from the November 2015 total of 5,707 dozen. Exports of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during the first 11 months of 2016 were 65,765 dozen, down 19 percent from 80,735 dozen for the first 11 months
of 2015.


The United States sent 27,826 dozen brooms
and brushes to Canada during the first 11 months
of 2016.


The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $56.89 in November 2016, up 3 percent from $55.11 for November 2015. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes for the first 11 months
of 2016 was $48.25, down 2 percent from $49.42 for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

Toothbrushes

During November 2016, the United States exported 11.1 million toothbrushes, down 38 percent from the total recorded in November 2015 of 17.9 million. During the first 11 months of 2016, 162 million toothbrushes were exported, up less than 1 percent from 160.6 million exported during the first 11 months of 2015.


The United States exported 62.3 million toothbrushes to Canada, 23.1 million to Germany and 19.3 million to Mexico, during the first 11 months of 2016.


The average price per toothbrush for November 2016 was 58 cents, up 43 percent from 33 cents for November 2015. The average price per toothbrush for the first 11 months of 2016 was 47 cents, up 1 cent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

Shaving Brushes

The United States exported 1.3 million shaving brushes during November 2016, up 30 percent from 1 million for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 15.2 million shaving brushes were exported, down 3 percent from 15.6 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


Brazil imported 6.5 million shaving brushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while Canada received 3.3 million.


The average price per shaving brush for November 2016 was $1.19, down 18 percent from $1.45 for November 2015. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was $1.21, up 8 percent from $1.13 for the first 11 months of 2015.

 

Artist Brushes

November 2016 exports of artist brushes totaled 1.1 million, the same as for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 10.3 million artist brushes were exported, down 10 percent from 11.4 million for the first 11 months of 2015.


Canada received 6.3 million artist brushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while Haiti imported 1.3 million.


The average price per artist brush was $2.87 during November 2016, up 15 percent from the average price for November 2015 of $2.49. For the first 11 months of 2016, the average price per artist brush was $3.53, up 46 percent from the average price for the first 11 months of 2015 of $2.42.

 

Paintbrushes

The export total of paintbrushes during November 2016 was 160,131, up 32 percent from 121,575
for November 2015. During the first 11 months of 2016, 2.9 million paintbrushes were exported, up
93 percent from 1.5 million for the first 11 months
of 2015.


Canada imported 1.5 million paintbrushes from the United States during the first 11 months of 2016, while the United Kingdom received 457,156.


The average price per paintbrush for November 2016 was $7.74, down 35 percent from $11.95 for November 2015. The average price for the first 11 months of 2016 was $5.71, down 54 percent from $12.46 for the first 11 months of 2015.



September 2016 Export Chart

 

Click here for the entire November 2016 Import/Export Statistics.

Industry News
Brush Manufacturers Attend Mill-Rose
54th Annual Luncheon In Cleveland

 

Mill-Rose Annual Luncheon

Brush manufacturers and suppliers gathered for the 54th annual
Mill-Rose Brush Manufacturers Luncheon in January
.


Brush manufacturers from around the world, and their suppliers, recently attended the 54th annual

Mill-Rose Brush Manufacturers luncheon in downtown Cleveland, OH.

Representatives from the United States, Europe, and countries including Mexico and Canada attended

the event, hosted by Mentor, OH-based The Mill-Rose Company.

Manufacturers and suppliers gathered during the week before the luncheon to discuss business trends, opportunities and other topics related to the brush industry.


Mark Fultz, president and CEO of Abtex Corporation and president of the American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA), also addressed the gathering.

A Mill Rose press release said, “Brushes manufactured by representative companies during the Mill-Rose Brush Manufacturers luncheon are used in every type of industry around the world. Applications include makeup/mascara brushes, hair brushes, floor sweeping and polishing brushes, gun cleaning brushes, car wash brushes, copier toner brushes, brooms, paint brushes and special brushes used in the medical field.”

Local and regional companies attending the event included Malish Brush, Precision Brush, Sherwin Williams, Spiral Brush, Brushes Corp., Phillips Brush and The Mill-Rose Company.

The Mill-Rose Company is a U.S. manufacturer of twisted-in-wire brushes. It is a family-owned organization, now in its fourth generation. Today the company operates manufacturing and warehouse facilities throughout the United States and Mexico.

 

 



West Coast Brush Manufacturers Association
Meeting Scheduled For October In Hawaii

Zephyr

 

The 2017 West Coast Brush Manufacturers Association (WCBMA) meeting is scheduled to
take place at the Grand Hyatt Resort and Spa, in Kauai, HI, on Oct. 1-5, 2017.


All suppliers, as well as brush manufacturers located west of the Mississippi River, are invited,
according to Gordon Brush President & CEO Kenneth L. Rakusin.


Reservations can be made until Aug. 15, 2017, using the following link https://aws.passkey.com/go/wcbma17 or by calling 888-421-1442 and referencing the West Coast

Brush Manufacturers Association or code G-GRDB. A two-night deposit is required at time of

reservation, which is fully refundable until Aug. 31, 2017.


The location of the meeting is The Grand Hyatt Resort and Spa, 1571 Poipu Rd., Koloa, HI 96756.
Phone: 808-742-1234. Website: https://kauai.grand.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home.html


“We have a price of $299 per room (single or double occupancy) for a mix of pool, partial ocean and
deluxe ocean views plus a reduced resort fee of $15 per day. Rates are plus tax. Self-parking is
included in the resort fee. There is a 10 percent discount at the Ilima Terrace for breakfast, and a
15 percent discount at Anara Spa, excluding retail purchases,” Rakusin said.


There will also be several opportunities for golf.


“On Monday, October 2, we will be playing in the morning at the Ocean Course at Hokuala
(formerly the Kauai Lagoons course) which is a 20-25 minute drive from the Hyatt. The negotiated
rate is $178 per person on this course (www.hokualakauai.com/golf),” Rakusin said. “On Wednesday, October 4, also in the morning, a scramble tournament will take place next to the Hyatt at the Poipu Bay Golf Course. This is another beautiful course that also has many holes along the ocean and a special rate of $180 per golfer (www.poipubaygolf.com).


“Based on feedback we’ve received, I expect this year’s meeting to be well attended. My wife, Maureen, and I visited several properties on Kauai and Maui in early January before selecting the Grand Hyatt. Our group has been to this property several times and it remains a favorite of many.”


For more information, contact Rakusin through email at KRakusin@gordonbrush.com
or call 323-450-2740.

 

 



From Weiler Corp:
New Tiger® Ceramic Cutting, Grinding And
Combination Wheels Deliver Superior Product
Life And Cut Rate

 

Weiler


Weiler Abrasives Group, of Cresco, PA, provider of abrasives, power brushes and maintenance
products for surface conditioning, has added Tiger® Ceramic to its portfolio of bonded abrasives.


According to Weiler, “Tiger Ceramic is a maximum performance line of cutting, grinding and combination wheels that delivers a superior combination of product life and cut rate — to help users maximize time on the job in a wide range of metal fabrication applications.

“The durability of Tiger Ceramic means more cuts and more material removed over the life of the wheel.”
According to a press release, “Ceramic grains utilize a crystalline structure designed with millions of
fracture points that self-sharpen at a higher rate than other grains. The result is a higher material
removal rate, faster cutting speeds, cooler grinding and reduced friction at less pressure, which
reduces operator fatigue. Lower temperature and less friction also reduce heat discoloration of the
work piece, and translate to a smoother cut and less kickback during operation of cutting wheels.”

Available in type 1 and type 27 styles, Tiger Ceramic can be used on stainless steel, inconel, high
nickel alloy, titanium and armored steel.

Visit www.weilercorp.com/ceramic for more information.




Abtex Corp Hires 2:
Purchasing Agent Carolyn Ribble And John Sherman Customer Service Rep


Carolyn Ribbleo

Carolyn Ribble

John Sherman

John Sherman


Abtex Corp., of Dresden, NY, has hired Carolyn Ribble as its new purchasing agent for the Abtex
Systems Group, and John Sherman as its new customer service representative for deburring
brushes and consumables.


Ribble brings 10 years of experience to the position. Prior to Abtex, she worked as a production planner
for KanPak LLC, in Penn Yan, NY. She also worked for Pharos Systems, IC25 and Paychex Corp.,
all in Rochester, NY. She is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma.


Sherman brings 15 years of manufacturing experience to the position. Prior to Abtex, he worked for Guardian Industries, in Geneva, NY, Avnet, in Rochester, and Badger Technologies, in Farmington, NY.
He lives in Penn Yan.


Since 1980, Abtex Corporation has been providing integrated brush/machine deburring solutions to the North American manufacturing industry. The company supplies filament brushes and custom-designed deburring machines for a wide variety of machined-part, aluminum-extrusion, fine-blanked, and
powdered-metal applications. Visit www.abtex.com for more information.

 



 

Milwaukee Dustless Brush Has New Logo
Honoring Its American Heritage And 120th Anniversary

Weiler

“Gordon Brush Mfg. Co., Inc., has revamped its Milwaukee Dustless Brush logo. The new logo reflects the brand's American heritage, and coincides with its 120th Anniversary. Milwaukee Dustless Brush is one of the oldest manufacturers of brooms, brushes, and squeegees in the United States,” said the company.


“Our new logo,” Gordon Brush President & CEO Ken Rakusin said, “is a bold modern design that shows its true colors: red, white, and blue with a star representing the American flag. This logo will carry the brand for the foreseeable future.”


“The simplicity in its design elegantly portrays Americana. The stylistic, asymmetrical ‘M’ with the

sharp corners, creates an image of market dominance for the brand,” said Alan Schechter, vice

president sales & marketing.


“We are very proud of our new logo,” Rakusin said, “and Milwaukee Dustless Brush is proud to be

an American manufacturer. Patriotism is paramount at Gordon Brush.”


Visit www.milwaukeedustless.com and www.gordonbrush.com for more information.


 


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